Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

©John Heino

KUMD FUND DRIVE

Some things you can count on
The frayed shoe string
Will break on the morning
You are already late

The cup with the slight
Crack will shatter to pieces
When its full of morning coffee

The oatmeal will boil over
On the just-cleaned stove top

You’ll run out of dental floss
When the dark raspberry seeds
Are lodged in a most unsightly manner
Between your lovely front teeth

But you’ll turn on KUMD
And tune in to the sound of Lisa’s voice
Which always brings you back to steady

The 2018 Richard Paul Teske Sieur du Lhut Creativity Conference is happening Monday, Oct. 15, and the public is invited to attend.  With two talented creative professionals speaking on the role of creativity across cultures and disciplines, the conference serves as an annual resource for students, faculty, artists and the greater community to better connect their creativity with the work they do.

Jim Richardson's Ore Boats in Space: Cartoon Visions of Duluth, Minnesota  is on display at the Red Herring through the end of November.

The Prøve Collective's Meat* & Greet on Thursday whets your appetite for the Ron Campbell Pop Up Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

©Jonathan Thunder. Used with permission.

Duluth's indigenous community is gathering at City Hall on this rainy Monday to sing, celebrate a new eagle staff, and observe a moment of silence.

Colombus Day has been controversial for a long time now; many people see his "discovery of the New World" as the first step down a long road of devastation for the people who were already here.

But in Duluth, organizers are moving from "a day of mourning" to one of celebration - one that can make their children proud of their heritage.

How Minnesotan Matt Goldman left home for Hollywood "because he didn't know any better," became a success writing for Seinfeld (in spite of himself), and why Norway and Sweden passed on his newest novel because it was "too Scandinavian."

Broken Ice is published by MacMillan.

Painting by Cherie Hamilton of kids in a green V W bus,
Cherie A. Hamilton

Local artist and writer, Cherie A. Hamilton brings her latest project "Notti Pine and the Dreamtime" to the public in a show at Zeitgeist Arts Cafe in downtown Duluth.  A series of paintings that illustrate her young adult novel telling the story of a young girl's spiritual journey.  Inspired by native Hawaiian tales and her own multicultural upbringing, Hamilton continues to bridge divides; past and present, young and old, black and white, art and literature.  The paintings will be accompanied by excerpts from her novel.

©Northwest Passage

 Under the Surface-A Photographic Journey of Hope and Healing opened yesterday at the Great Lakes Aquarium.  It's the result of a project that uses diving and underwater photography as therapy at a residential treatment center in Webster, WI.

"The Story" 24" x 24"Credit Adam SwansonEdit | Remove

©Gary Boelhower

Duluth's newly-minted Poet Laureate  (not even 24 hours yet) for 2018-2020 shares his thoughts on making poetry "more a part of the everyday fabric of Duluth": everything from replacing new-business ribbon-cuttings with some poetry read to reflect on community, to starting city council meetings with a poem, perhaps, related to one of the agenda items.

Gabisile Nkosi

The centenary celebration of Nelson Mandela's birthday continues with a local arts event, a talk at the Tweed Museum of Art.  Ray Allard presents "Art Against Oppression in South Africa," Thursday, Sept. 27, 6-8 p.m.

A Minnesota artist, Allard and his wife lived in post-apartheid South Africa and bring a perspective on the arts and censorship in the complex political landscape that Mandela survived and thrived.

More information on the Mandela centenary and the arts talk at the following links:

©Honor the Earth

In an address she called "Black Snake Chronicles: police, courts and victories," Winona LaDuke provides an update on the status of native resistance to pipelines, including three new landmarks in native resistance in Canada, Minnesota, and North Dakota.

Much of what we love about nature is the same thing we love about art: how we feel when we look at it.

The Duluth Art Institute and Hartley Nature center are presenting a series called Art, Naturally that runs through next summer.  The first installment is tonight at 7pm, Painting Under the Full Moon with Karen Savage Blue. 

©Kelly Hallman

Parents want to keep their children safe from anything that could harm them - including information.

Parents of Black sons report painful conversations with them about how society may treat them, but Kelly Hallman, the director of IMAGEN (Indigenous Adolescent Girls' Empowerment Network) says Native girls are already tuned into the dangers they see around them.

Lisa Johnson

Japan. Russia. Canada. Kurdistan.

Just a few of the countries whose relationship with the United States has become increasingly fraught in the last months, but also just a few of the countries with whom Duluth enjoys a sister-city relationship.

The chance for people here to connect to the wider world, to meet people who are simultaneously different from and the same as they -- those relationships could be seen as the antidote to fear.

Concerns about weather prompted a move to the DECC for today's International Day of Peace Celebration.

Sarah Stonich doesn't let go of things easily.

Or perhaps they just don't let go of her.

Even though she lives in the Twin Cities, northern Minnesota -- and the characters she's created who live there -- keep reappearing in her work.

Laurentian Divide is published by the University of Minnesota Press.

Duluth Artist Carla Hamilton's a solo show called “Minnesota Nice” is up for one more week at Prøve Gallery, welcoming visitors to stop in during the Downtown Duluth Arts Walk on Friday, Sept. 28.

Hamilton's exhibit has brought a fresh voice inviting the audience to examine their cultural constructs and social discomfort that create and sustain disparity and inequality through collage, film and more.

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