Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

skipsandman.com

Talking Politics is hosted by Mike Mayou, a UMD student and activist from Duluth. Over the next three weeks, hear conversations with all three Congressional District 8 candidates, starting this week with Skip Sandman.

Jim Richardson's Ore Boats in Space: Cartoon Visions of Duluth, Minnesota  is on display at the Red Herring through the end of November.

The Prøve Collective's Meat* & Greet on Thursday whets your appetite for the Ron Campbell Pop Up Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

©Jonathan Thunder. Used with permission.

Duluth's indigenous community is gathering at City Hall on this rainy Monday to sing, celebrate a new eagle staff, and observe a moment of silence.

Colombus Day has been controversial for a long time now; many people see his "discovery of the New World" as the first step down a long road of devastation for the people who were already here.

But in Duluth, organizers are moving from "a day of mourning" to one of celebration - one that can make their children proud of their heritage.

©John P. Richardson

If it doesn't rain tomorrow, the forecasted northwesterly winds could mean good bird-watching at Hawk Ridge.

The trick, says Count Director John Richardson, is to get there during the "golden hour/s," usually between 8:00 and 10:00am.

AWholeLotOfSpinky/Flickr

UMD attempts to combat the underage drinking problem – actually, alcohol use by students regardless of their age – through a program called AlcoholEdu.

It’s an online program designed to provide practical information and advice for a wide variety of alchohol-related situations.  And it’s mandatory for freshmen.

©Laura Erickson. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

When scores of dead birds began showing up in the Northland this week, folks did what folks around here do: they called Laura Erickson to learn more about it.

The reporters, though, must not be regular listeners/readers of For the Birds; if they were, they would have known that a) birds can, occasionally, become intoxicated by the fermenting berries of some trees and bushes and 2) the dead and injured birds being reported aren't drunk - they eat bugs, not berries.

How Minnesotan Matt Goldman left home for Hollywood "because he didn't know any better," became a success writing for Seinfeld (in spite of himself), and why Norway and Sweden passed on his newest novel because it was "too Scandinavian."

Broken Ice is published by MacMillan.

Jonathan Reyes/Flickr

Bring a book.

Stare at your phone.

Invite a friend to distract you.

Nineteen area hospitals and two regional air ambulances are counting on donated blood to respond to emergencies, and the donation process keeps getting easier.

More information about the donation process is available here.  Memorial Blood Centers are on the UMD campus on the first Thursday of every month.

©John Heino. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

They're responsible for millions of dollars in tourism revenue across the country, and feature prominently in the portfolios of photographers, artists and anybody with a smart phone.

But those fall colors: the gorgeous reds (anthocyanins) and shimmering yellow and oranges (carotenoids) are really a kind of tree sunscreen.

Seriously.

Vin Crosbie/Flickr

How did we get from "the most trusted man in America" to "fake news"?

Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP/Ninian Reid/Flickr

One thing's for sure: people were talking about sexual assault last week.

Between Bill Cosby's sentencing to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee,  it was just about all anyone was talking about, on and off the air and online.

©Lisa Johnson

The less you know about apple maggots the happier you'll be.

Suffice it to say there ARE ways to get rid of them, and even if you're left with bumpy apples, you can still make fabulous stuff with them.

The apples, not the apple maggots.

©Northwest Passage

 Under the Surface-A Photographic Journey of Hope and Healing opened yesterday at the Great Lakes Aquarium.  It's the result of a project that uses diving and underwater photography as therapy at a residential treatment center in Webster, WI.

"The Story" 24" x 24"Credit Adam SwansonEdit | Remove

©John P. Richardson. Used with permission

Hawk-watchers were in "raptors" Sunday (see what we did there?) at Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory with the capture of a leucistic red-tailed hawk.  Many people were on hand to see the bird in person, while others followed ... raptly (!) ... the Facebook page:

"In 30 years of banding hawks, the Banding Director Frank Nicoletti perhaps has only had one partially leucistic Red-tail before and certainly not to the extent this bird today was.

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