Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

MN Reads talked with Sarah Stonich on September 19, 2013 about her latest book, "Vacationland." It is a novel of stories intersecting at a broken-down fishing resort in the north woods of Minnesota

Vacationland is published by University of Minnesota Press.

©John P. Richardson

The northwest winds we'll contend with today will be a nuisance everywhere but Hawk Ridge, where they'll drive migrating birds of prey right down into the waiting binoculars of the hawk counters.

Count Director and special guest star John Richardson joins us this morning to tell us more.

Lisa Johnson

Japan. Russia. Canada. Kurdistan.

Just a few of the countries whose relationship with the United States has become increasingly fraught in the last months, but also just a few of the countries with whom Duluth enjoys a sister-city relationship.

The chance for people here to connect to the wider world, to meet people who are simultaneously different from and the same as they -- those relationships could be seen as the antidote to fear.

Concerns about weather prompted a move to the DECC for today's International Day of Peace Celebration.

Sarah Stonich doesn't let go of things easily.

Or perhaps they just don't let go of her.

Even though she lives in the Twin Cities, northern Minnesota -- and the characters she's created who live there -- keep reappearing in her work.

Laurentian Divide is published by the University of Minnesota Press.

Project Consent

There's a national conversation taking place in our country now as the #metoo movement gathers momentum -- a conversation about consent.

But consent - what it is and, more importantly, what it's not - is an idea not limited to sexual encounters.

Superior Environmental Services Division/Facebook

People of a certain age remember when "don't litter," was at the forefront of everyone's consciousness.   

47 years after Keep America Beautiful's famous public service announcement admonished "people start pollution; people can stop it," it doesn't seem like we've gotten the message.

By some accounts, people fear public speaking more than death.

So while Duluth Mayor Emily Larson is glad folks who are comfortable getting up in front of a crowd at a City Council meeting are speaking up about their concerns, she wanted to continue another option.

In addition to connecting with different people in different neighborhoods, her "City Hall in the City" listening sessions are giving folks a chance to share concerns in a way that makes them more comfortable.

KUMD's Adam Reinhardt reports.

peoniesfromthefield.com

Now is a great time to divide and replant perennials.

Warm soil temps and cool air temps mean they tend to their business of setting roots, and as Tom Kasper reports, they're not as fragile as they seem.

Julianne Vasicheck

Julianne "Montana" Vasichek grew up playing hockey. She was a Team USA defenseman, an All-American with UMD and a three-time NCAA champ at UMD; twice as a player and once as the Hockey Equipment Manager/Strength and Conditioning Coach.

So it was bad enough when she got sick in 2008 and it turned out to be a rare, incurable, and untreatable liver disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). When a blood clot in her ailing liver sent her into the hospital and from there to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, her friends came to say goodbye.

Tom McGregor/Facebook

Artists in Grand Marais were, to use Annie Dugan's phrase, "skittering around" over the weekend, creating art outdoors at the Plein Air Festival.

Anyone can snap a photo with their smart phone and keep moving, but what happens when you stay with a view and commit it to canvas?

Roman Kraft

This week, what happens when you believe in someone ... even someone you don't know?

©Lisa Johnson

Larry Weber's not the kind of guy to waste time railing against Mother Nature.

That being said ...he's not always a huge fan of warmer temps.

For one thing, our overnight lows in the mid-to-upper 60s are around the normal daytime highs.

For another, the south winds responsible have dramatically dropped the raptor numbers over Hawk Ridge.

But the sky-watching conditions, at least, have been fabulous.

©Stephanie Randby

A little kindness can go a long way.

This month marks 21 years of Tips for Hardy Gardeners on the air at KUMD!  But more than a long-lived radio feature, it's the dedication of a volunteer that's made it happen all this time.  Thank you, Tom Kasper!

Andreas Andrews/Flickr

Some experts figure a third of all the food produced globally for human consumption goes to waste.

Others say it's closer to 40 percent.

And unlike some kinds of "extra" food at grocery stores or restaurants, you can't repurpose the muffin you only ook a bite out of  and left on your plate.

But with a little bit of humor and a light touch, UMD's Office of Sustainability is hoping to remind students whose eyes are bigger than their stomachs that they can always go back for seconds if they need them.

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