Larry Weber

©John P. Richardson

If it doesn't rain tomorrow, the forecasted northwesterly winds could mean good bird-watching at Hawk Ridge.

The trick, says Count Director John Richardson, is to get there during the "golden hour/s," usually between 8:00 and 10:00am.

©Kaitlin Erpestad,Hartley Nature Preschool. Used with permission.

In this encore edition of Backyard Almanac from September 23, 2016, the question emerges:  it's not why the snapping turtle crossed the road, it's how.

©John P. Richardson

The northwest winds we'll contend with today will be a nuisance everywhere but Hawk Ridge, where they'll drive migrating birds of prey right down into the waiting binoculars of the hawk counters.

Count Director and special guest star John Richardson joins us this morning to tell us more.

©Lisa Johnson

Larry Weber's not the kind of guy to waste time railing against Mother Nature.

That being said ...he's not always a huge fan of warmer temps.

For one thing, our overnight lows in the mid-to-upper 60s are around the normal daytime highs.

For another, the south winds responsible have dramatically dropped the raptor numbers over Hawk Ridge.

But the sky-watching conditions, at least, have been fabulous.

Mrdorkesq [via Flickr]

August was awesome, but Naturalist and author Larry Weber explains why September is wonderful. too.  Among many things to note: Bird migration is underway and next week will be a prime week to view raptors at Hawk Ridge.  It's also "turtle time," with baby snapping turtles emerging from their nests.  Leaves are starting to change and some late-season wildflowers are blooming too.

TexasEagle/Flickr

Larry talks about migration, day length, birds, bucks, frogs, goldenrod, spider webs, apples, berries and more but the gist of his program today can be summed up in two words:

Get outside.

©Steve Kolbe. Used with permission

August, announced Larry Weber this morning, is one of his 12 favorite months.

He talked migration at Hawk Ridge, where the counters are hard at work, the fabulousness of spiders, how a mayfly hatch is a good indicator of clean water, and how come he's the guy driving so slowly and gawking at the goldenrod by the side of the road.

Susanne Nilsson [via Flickr]

Naturalist and author Larry Weber reminds us that the fog and dews that we often see in August make for some amazing spider web views in the mornings.   That said, we've had less rain this month than we should have.  Mushrooms and berries are on the scene, the sphinx moths are out and about, and sunflowers, aster, goldenrod and arrowhead are gracing our landscape as well.

Eclipse 2017/NASA

(Larry Weber doesn't get to be an expert naturalist by sitting on his couch.  But if he's doing to be on the road, once in a while, he's going to be without cell service.  That's what happened this morning, but Larry called in at 9:00am to apologize, to remind us that August is still awesome, to watch the Perseids this weekend, and that by the time he joins us next week, chances are Hawk Ridge wi

©Lisa Johnson

Some things that fly are starting to think about migration (bird, monarchs), some are thinking about starting families (goldfinches), some things with leaves (sumac, Virginia creeper) are thinking about fall color and some things that like walks (Larry Weber) are starting to think about spiders, shorter days and berries.

Mary RN @ Morguefile

Larry Weber shares weather almanac from the past month, nearly the warmest July on record and basically no rainfall as reported by the National Weather Service.  Monarchs, dragonflies and berries are all out while the songbirds have quieted down. The show-stealer today is the full moon, lunar eclipse and the close, viewable mars. Looking like mostly clear skies should allow for great sky watching this weekend.

NPR on The Moon and Mars

Astro Bob's Astronomy for Everyone/Bob King. Used with permission.

Even as he was being devoured alive by mosquitos, our intrepid Backyard Almanac host, Larry Weber,  reported some weather stats for the first half of July, the latest arrivals on the wildflower scene, and - gulp! - some early migrants and some leaf color already!

Shelby L Bell [via Flickr]

Naturalist, author and educator Larry Weber, always a keen observer of what is, acknowledges an important anniversary.  

Terry Priest/Flickr

Summer officially arrived Thursday morning at 5:07am.

Here in the Northland, the sun came up at 5:14am.

Today, it came up at 5:15am.

Leave it to Larry Weber to point out the days are already starting to get longer.

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