migrants

©John P. Richardson

If it doesn't rain tomorrow, the forecasted northwesterly winds could mean good bird-watching at Hawk Ridge.

The trick, says Count Director John Richardson, is to get there during the "golden hour/s," usually between 8:00 and 10:00am.

TexasEagle/Flickr

Larry talks about migration, day length, birds, bucks, frogs, goldenrod, spider webs, apples, berries and more but the gist of his program today can be summed up in two words:

Get outside.

Astro Bob's Astronomy for Everyone/Bob King. Used with permission.

Even as he was being devoured alive by mosquitos, our intrepid Backyard Almanac host, Larry Weber,  reported some weather stats for the first half of July, the latest arrivals on the wildflower scene, and - gulp! - some early migrants and some leaf color already!

Mumes World/Flickr

How does that meme on Facebook go?

"April showers bring snow plowers"?

Leave it to Larry Weber to remind us just how important these April snows are.

We're finally caught up on moisture for the month; yes, snow in April is "normal;" we'll have 14 hours of daylight come Sunday and the white pelicans have returned to the St. Louis River.

April's first half is running about six degrees warmer than usual ... the greening has begun ... and you can hear the early spring trio (chorus frogs, spring peepers and wood frogs) around the Northland.

Lisa Johnson

Folks in Larry Weber's Minnesota Master Naturalist class don't sit around the campfire telling scary stories ... they go out after dusk looking for spiders and spider webs instead.

Matt Stratmoen/Flickr

Larry runs down the numbers for us on our cooler-than-usual May so far ... and he and Laura Erickson were charmed by the same bird this week.

Ian Griffiths/Flickr

Frogs are calling, red maples are flowering, painted turtles are crowding logs to bask in the (scarce) sun ... 

and it's raining and cold.  Again.

This weekend's forecast calls for sunny skies and 45 degrees on Saturday ... and clouds, a 50/50 chance of snow and a high of 20 on Sunday.

And that, says Larry Weber, is March in a nutshell.

Mraz Center for the Performing Arts

"Tra la, it's May, the lusty month of May
That lovely month when everyone goes blissfully astray...
"

"The Lusty Month of May" (From "Camelot") was written by Lerner and Loewe

Larry Weber elects not to sing, but he's got our April wrap-up (warmer and drier than usual), the word on spring wildflowers (wetter woods would help them) and a look back (on this date in 2013 and 2014, there was still ice on the lakes and snow on the ground in many places!).

 

Credit: Rothamsted Research

Author, educator and naturalist Larry Weber wraps up March for us: it's been warmer than normal and we have only half the moisture we should have.  Returning this week: sandhill cranes, grackles, cormorants, silver maple blooms -- and ballooning baby spiders!