Perennials

Tom Kasper/Facebook

Cool air temps, warm soil temps: it's the best time to plant/relocate/divide/share perennials ... but Tom Kasper reveals a deteriorating relationship with his garden as the season moves on.

F. D. Richards [via Flickr]

  The soggy ground continues to bring the threat of black molds and powdery mildew, and gardeners need to be mindful of what flowers and plants to prune, and what to keep and possibly treat to prevent the return of these fungi next spring.

Despite the soggy ground, now is the time to divide perennials - irises and peonies, for example - to best prepare them for next year.  Dividing can help underperforming flowers to produce more and better blooms in  the coming seasons.

Meg Lessard (via Flickr)

  With the arrival of spring, the ground thaws, the rains and melting snow are soaking into the gardens and lawns throughout the Northland. 

   As the perennials appear, gardeners would be advised to step lightly for the time being so as not to compact the wet soil.