Northland Morning Interviews

Daily interviews with a local focus airing at 8 a.m. Monday through Friday on Northland Morning.

©John Heino

KUMD FUND DRIVE

Some things you can count on
The frayed shoe string
Will break on the morning
You are already late

The cup with the slight
Crack will shatter to pieces
When its full of morning coffee

The oatmeal will boil over
On the just-cleaned stove top

You’ll run out of dental floss
When the dark raspberry seeds
Are lodged in a most unsightly manner
Between your lovely front teeth

But you’ll turn on KUMD
And tune in to the sound of Lisa’s voice
Which always brings you back to steady

skipsandman.com

Talking Politics is hosted by Mike Mayou, a UMD student and activist from Duluth. Over the next three weeks, hear conversations with all three Congressional District 8 candidates, starting this week with Skip Sandman.

Next week on Talking Politics, Pete Stauber, the Republican running for the congressional seat. Talking Politics next Tuesday, October 16 at 8am on Northland Morning.

AWholeLotOfSpinky/Flickr

UMD attempts to combat the underage drinking problem – actually, alcohol use by students regardless of their age – through a program called AlcoholEdu.

It’s an online program designed to provide practical information and advice for a wide variety of alchohol-related situations.  And it’s mandatory for freshmen.

©Laura Erickson. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

When scores of dead birds began showing up in the Northland this week, folks did what folks around here do: they called Laura Erickson to learn more about it.

The reporters, though, must not be regular listeners/readers of For the Birds; if they were, they would have known that a) birds can, occasionally, become intoxicated by the fermenting berries of some trees and bushes and 2) the dead and injured birds being reported aren't drunk - they eat bugs, not berries.

Jonathan Reyes/Flickr

Bring a book.

Stare at your phone.

Invite a friend to distract you.

Nineteen area hospitals and two regional air ambulances are counting on donated blood to respond to emergencies, and the donation process keeps getting easier.

More information about the donation process is available here.  Memorial Blood Centers are on the UMD campus on the first Thursday of every month.

Vin Crosbie/Flickr

How did we get from "the most trusted man in America" to "fake news"?

Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP/Ninian Reid/Flickr

One thing's for sure: people were talking about sexual assault last week.

Between Bill Cosby's sentencing to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee,  it was just about all anyone was talking about, on and off the air and online.

©John P. Richardson. Used with permission

Hawk-watchers were in "raptors" Sunday (see what we did there?) at Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory with the capture of a leucistic red-tailed hawk.  Many people were on hand to see the bird in person, while others followed ... raptly (!) ... the Facebook page:

"In 30 years of banding hawks, the Banding Director Frank Nicoletti perhaps has only had one partially leucistic Red-tail before and certainly not to the extent this bird today was.

©Deb Holman

The Loaves and Fishes Community is a small non-profit in Duluth offering "hospitality and advocacy to people experiencing homelessness."

But Joel Kilgour, a longtime resident of the men's house and community organizer and activist, says they're turning away "probably 30 guys a day."

Perhaps the most visible faces of homelessness are those of people suffering from mental illness or addiction, but Kilgour says most of us are only one step away from living under a bridge ourselves.

©Honor the Earth

In an address she called "Black Snake Chronicles: police, courts and victories," Winona LaDuke provides an update on the status of native resistance to pipelines, including three new landmarks in native resistance in Canada, Minnesota, and North Dakota.

©Mike Mayou

It took more than three hours, but the Duluth City Council voted last night to table the Duluth Police Department's request to purchase over $83,000 worth of shielded helmets, body armor and crowd-control batons, among other items.

Proponents call it "personal protection equipment." Opponents call it "riot gear."

At a packed council chamber last night, members of the community alternately urged councilors to approve the purchase and table the request until more conversations could be held.

Lisa Johnson

Japan. Russia. Canada. Kurdistan.

Just a few of the countries whose relationship with the United States has become increasingly fraught in the last months, but also just a few of the countries with whom Duluth enjoys a sister-city relationship.

The chance for people here to connect to the wider world, to meet people who are simultaneously different from and the same as they -- those relationships could be seen as the antidote to fear.

Concerns about weather prompted a move to the DECC for today's International Day of Peace Celebration.

Project Consent

There's a national conversation taking place in our country now as the #metoo movement gathers momentum -- a conversation about consent.

But consent - what it is and, more importantly, what it's not - is an idea not limited to sexual encounters.

By some accounts, people fear public speaking more than death.

So while Duluth Mayor Emily Larson is glad folks who are comfortable getting up in front of a crowd at a City Council meeting are speaking up about their concerns, she wanted to continue another option.

In addition to connecting with different people in different neighborhoods, her "City Hall in the City" listening sessions are giving folks a chance to share concerns in a way that makes them more comfortable.

KUMD's Adam Reinhardt reports.

Julianne Vasicheck

Julianne "Montana" Vasichek grew up playing hockey. She was a Team USA defenseman, an All-American with UMD and a three-time NCAA champ at UMD; twice as a player and once as the Hockey Equipment Manager/Strength and Conditioning Coach.

So it was bad enough when she got sick in 2008 and it turned out to be a rare, incurable, and untreatable liver disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). When a blood clot in her ailing liver sent her into the hospital and from there to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, her friends came to say goodbye.

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