Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Lisa Johnson

 (This episode was originally aired April 27, 2020)

In this episode, we meet Cindy Hale of Clover Valley Farms, accidental farmer, educator, and now producer, educator, and infrastructure coordinator for the Finland Food Chain.

It's hard not to think, in the midst of our pandemic-challenged lives, that this whole "how am I gonna get food" thing would be a lot simpler if we could just go back in time about 80 years.

Aaron Kloss

It feels like at least six years in Pandemic Time ... but in actuality it's only been six months. 

But artists have been hard at work responding to these times through their art, trying to figure out how to survive financially, and how to maintain their creative and economic health.

Some are doing a canvas a day to keep their artistic and marketing chops honedd, but even if you're not an artist yourself, Annie Dugan is suggesting you take a look at your social media feed through the lens of art.

Wisconsin Historical Society

Skip Sandman is one of our spiritual leaders and he spoke for the pipe.

The repercussions on society from the pandemic are usually pretty grim.

But Duluth's poet laureate, Gary Boelhower, says poetry reading began a resurgence a couple of years ago, and while no one has surveyed it since the start of the year, he thinks more and more people are finding it an accessible art form that can express the depth of our experience.

After all, Gary says "poetry saved my life."

Seven Council Fires Native Art/Facebook

  (This episode originally aired April 21, 2020)

Jim Rock is a little bit starstruck.

For one thing, he's an ethnoarcheoastronomer.

For another thing, Dakota people believe they come from the star world.

And for another thing, when asked to read a poem in Dakota, Jim not only found one, he wrote another one, a love poem for his wife.

Between working from home and schooling at home, most of us feel we're winning if we have clean sweatpants.

But pandemic or no, artists gotta art, and you can see more of what a handful of local folks have been up to here. 

And if you're not feeling your social media feed these days, don't start "unfriending" quite yet.

Just start adding museums and artists to your favorites list and watch your feed blossom into a thing of beauty.

Steve Premo/MNHS Press

This program was originally aired March 9, 2020.

A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota was published back in 2016, but it's enjoyed a renaissance of sorts this summer.

The collection of essays features 16 diverse voices of people of color, talking about the Minnesota in which they live.

Annie Dugan. Used with permission.

  A temporary, outdoor, public art sculptural installation … UNWEAVING explores the ways tradition, culture, communities, and individuals are unwoven when we are disconnected from our foundation of ancestral history (ie.when we don’t know our stories or when truths are suppressed or not acknowledged.) A different unweaving can loosen us from perpetuating unconscious pattern behaviors, make sense of our position in the larger social fabric, and enable reweaving a more honest and equitable future.

Artist Tia Keobounpheng says she came unraveled about six years ago.

But in the process of embracing "unweaving," she started asking herself questions like:

What would happen if I let go of binary labels like “good/bad” and “right/wrong” ?

What is keeping me from seeing all that I cannot see?

What happens if I let go of needing to be right?

The answers to those questions can be found - partly - in her new public art installation UNWEAVING.

Copyright Ivy Vainio. Used with permission.

I have no doubt this sewing machine made face masks over a hundred years ago and my grandmother would have made masks. There was a huge second wave of that pandemic and entire families died in a single day. They didn’t have access to ventilators back then and this machine would have been a life saver. My grandmother saved lives as a young woman and I never knew a thing about it.


Thank heavens for Chico Bon Bon.

The irrepressible monkey with a tool belt embarks upon his sixth picture book adventure with calm, confidence, and the Right Tools.

Author and illustrator Chris Monroe talks about the book, and creativity in the time of pandemic.

Kezban Arca Batıbeki/ Instagram

  (This episode originally aired April 10, 2020)

Lisa Fitzpatrick speaks a lot of languages.

And she loves poetry.  In fact, she was the one who originally thought of a poetry feature on KUMD, sharing poetry in different languages.

But when she started thinking about a poem to read, herself, there was only one choice for her: Turkish.

This is a poem by Aşık Veysel called "Uzun İnce Bir Yoldayım"

Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay

Duluth Folk School classes, available for your small group, pod, or "love bubble" include building canoe paddles, tool boxes, or a rack for your ski jackets

2019 People's Choice Winners: Kid’s Choice – Ivan Gilbert, “Sea Turtle” Adult’s Choice – Toni Dachis, “Prince”Credit Minnesota State FairEdit | Remove

Former Minnesotan Linda Norlander calls Tacoma, Washington home these days, but she's still deeply tied to her roots in Pelican Rapids and memories of family trips to the North Shore and the BWCA.

She joins us to talk about the first in her series of "Cabin in the Lake" mysteries, and how she came to grips with some modern-day controversies in the process.

Emily Vikre

(this episode originally aired April 14, 2020)

Take:

  • a woman's business-self (co-founder of Vikre Distillery)
  • her mom-self (distance learning with two little kids)
  • her self-self (nerd who loves learning for the sake of knowledge)

Confine at home for several weeks, with internet access.

Result: Homeschooling with Cocktails

Emily says:

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