Chris Harwood

Production Director / Interim Program Director

Chris Harwood grew up in Duluth, and as a high school student he was a volunteer announcer at KUMD.  He received a BA in Music from Macalester College in 1993, and an MA in Musicology from Columbia University in 2004.  Upon returning to Duluth in 2006, he resumed volunteering as the host of Blues Alley until 2013.  As a volunteer, he also created and continues to host Soul Village since it began in early 2009.

Now also employed as KUMD's Production Director, Chris oversees the creation of pre-recorded announcements and many other on-air programs, including Women's Words and Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa.  On the air, he can be heard regularly on Music Through the Day on Mondays and Tuesdays, on Soul Village on Friday afternoons, and occasionally hosts Northland Morning as well. 

Chris is a musician, a music historian, and an avid record collector.  He has worked as an audio engineer, an arranger, and a record producer.  In the mid-1990s Chris was the Music Coordinator for A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor.  He has also worked for BMI, The Lake Superior Chamber Orchestra, and worked behind the scenes for many musicals and concerts in New York City. 

Ways to Connect

KUMD's Chris Harwood talks with musician, songwriter, and producer BrownMark about his memoir, My Life in the Purple Kingdom, published 2020 by University of Minnesota Press.  Within a couple months in the summer of 1981, he went from being Mark Brown, a nineteen year-old 7-Eleven employee struggling to broaden the sound of his Minneapolis band Fantasy, to becoming BrownMark, playing bass with Prince and The Revolution in Los Angeles as the opening act for The Rolling Stones.

Fall colors along a hiking trail
Christine Dean for KUMD

It's officially fall; the days are getting shorter and the trees are putting on a colorful display.

There are still late season wildflowers adding to the color, and milkweed pods are opening to release their seeds.

Mushrooms, migrating ducks, bats, and bugs are all part of this week's phenology report from Larry Weber.

University of Minnesota Duluth/Dept. of Theatre

In the COVID-19 pandemic era performing artists have been challenged to discover new ways to share their gifts with their audiences.  Some solutions, like streaming on social media, did not even exist two decades ago. 

Chris Harwood

St. Louis County Public Works and the City of Duluth will be holding a virtual public meeting to provide information about - and get feedback on - plans to construct a roundabout at the intersection of Glenwood Street and Snively Road.  KUMD talks with Vic Lund, a St. Louis County Traffic Engineer, about the considerations that were used by the city and county when determining a roundabout would be the best option at that intersection.

Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy

Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy, published a new book, called Eyewitness: Minnesota Voices on Climate Change, that features short stories, poems, and artwork authored by prominent figures and ordinary people across the state.  KUMD speaks with Erin Sharkey, poet, essayist, and graphic designer who was a member of Climate Generation's Selection Committee for the anthology.

LISC Duluth and the US Bank Foundation recently joined to provide Main Street Lincoln Park businesses grants to implement their COVID-19 safe reopening and recovery plans.  Grants of $5,000 along with technical assistance provided by Main Street Lincoln Park and the Entrepreneur Fund were awarded to eight businesses from retail to the trades to a neighborhood farm.  Those businesses include Liila Boutique, Sew Duluth, New-2-You, Duluth Pottery, Sheet Metal Solutions, Flora North, Saltless Sea Urban Farm, and Hemlocks Leatherworks.

From the Heavens exhibit at the U.S. Library of Congress. [Public Domain]

Bob King tells us tonight could be a great night to see the Perseids, an annual meteor shower that occurs when the earth passes through the debris left by the Comet Swift–Tuttle.

Keri Pickett/
Keri Pickett/PICKETT PICTURES LLC

In years past Honor the Earth was able to host an annual gala event at Bayfront Festival Park to raise grant funding for native organizations.  In May of this year, undaunted by the challenges of a pandemic, two of the Honor the Earth cofounders, Winona LaDuke, and Amy Ray and Emily Saliers of Indigo Girls, staged an online music event that raised $230,000 of grant money that will be awarded to 50 native organizations around the U.S.

Despite the difficulties in accessing many art galleries in these difficult days, Annie tells us about two great opportunities to interact with art this week online.

NRRI/University of Minnesota Duluth

With the help of researchers at NRRI, ash trees killed by the emerald ash borer are being repurposed in pilot projects in Minnesota as biochar.  This material can filter harmful chemicals from storm water runoff, enhance soil microbial health, increase soil drought resistance and store carbon in soils to mitigate climate change.

Jim, the Photographer [via Flickr]

Larry Weber observes that if this month's weather continues as it has, we'll have one of the wettest and hottest Julys on record. But the rain has benefitted the many ripening berries around the region.  Basswood trees are in bloom right now which some beekeepers say creates the best honey.  Many late summer flowers are beginning their bloom cycles as well, including tall sunflowers.  Canada thistle is starting to seed, providing food and nesting material for American goldfinches who mate later in the year than many other songbirds.

Forest Simon, via Unsplash

Death has always been patient.  For some it comes after a long and full life with boats and vacations and mortgages and big weddings and handshakes and Christmas cards from bankers. It comes with friendly nods and gentle warnings for driving a few miles above the speed limit.

For others it comes randomly with agony and pain and humiliation for a twenty dollar mistake.

Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases Johns Hopkins

Epidemiologist Dr. Catherine McCarty joins us this morning for a half-hour of conversation about the two kinds of testing much of the world is anxiously waiting for: the test to see of someone has COVID-19 and the test to see if they have the antibodies.

Emma Matthews/Unsplash

Should your kids be getting up at the "regular" time, even if they don't have a class online they need to join?

Should they be doing more chores around the house, volunteering or engaging in other Useful Pursuits?

Boys & Girls Clubs of the Northland/Facebook

It takes a village, not just to raise a child,  but to feed children especially when the safety nets (like school meals) are compromised.

Ecolibrium3, the Salvation Army and the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Northland are stepping up to make sure kids have meals and snacks now that it's spring break.

Information on how you can help the Boys & Girls Clubs provide for our local kids is here.

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