Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

©Kaitlin Erpestad,Hartley Nature Preschool. Used with permission.

In this encore edition of Backyard Almanac from September 23, 2016, the question emerges:  it's not why the snapping turtle crossed the road, it's how.

©Gary Boelhower

Duluth's newly-minted Poet Laureate  (not even 24 hours yet) for 2018-2020 shares his thoughts on making poetry "more a part of the everyday fabric of Duluth": everything from replacing new-business ribbon-cuttings with some poetry read to reflect on community, to starting city council meetings with a poem, perhaps, related to one of the agenda items.

©Deb Holman

The Loaves and Fishes Community is a small non-profit in Duluth offering "hospitality and advocacy to people experiencing homelessness."

But Joel Kilgour, a longtime resident of the men's house and community organizer and activist, says they're turning away "probably 30 guys a day."

Perhaps the most visible faces of homelessness are those of people suffering from mental illness or addiction, but Kilgour says most of us are only one step away from living under a bridge ourselves.

Forever Home 9/27

Sep 27, 2018

Snoopy

Meet Snoopy. He is a one year old male Chihuahua mix. True to the Chihuahua nature, it takes him awhile to warm up to new people. Snoopy, however, is just an active puppy at heart who just finally needs a stable family to love him. He has been vet checked, neutered and vaccinated. Come to Contented Critters and meet this little guy. 

©Honor the Earth

In an address she called "Black Snake Chronicles: police, courts and victories," Winona LaDuke provides an update on the status of native resistance to pipelines, including three new landmarks in native resistance in Canada, Minnesota, and North Dakota.

@Lincoln Park Farmers Market

When the Lincoln Park Farmers Market started up six years ago, it wasn't just so folks could buy some flowers and a little fresh fruit for breakfast.

A survey had just been conducted that showed people in the Lincoln Park neighborhood weren't living as long as everyone else in the community.  In fact, no access to healthy food, due to transportation problems and the distance to the nearest grocery stores, was shaving about ten years off their life expectancies.

©Mike Mayou

It took more than three hours, but the Duluth City Council voted last night to table the Duluth Police Department's request to purchase over $83,000 worth of shielded helmets, body armor and crowd-control batons, among other items.

Proponents call it "personal protection equipment." Opponents call it "riot gear."

At a packed council chamber last night, members of the community alternately urged councilors to approve the purchase and table the request until more conversations could be held.

Much of what we love about nature is the same thing we love about art: how we feel when we look at it.

The Duluth Art Institute and Hartley Nature center are presenting a series called Art, Naturally that runs through next summer.  The first installment is tonight at 7pm, Painting Under the Full Moon with Karen Savage Blue. 

©Kelly Hallman

Parents want to keep their children safe from anything that could harm them - including information.

Parents of Black sons report painful conversations with them about how society may treat them, but Kelly Hallman, the director of IMAGEN (Indigenous Adolescent Girls' Empowerment Network) says Native girls are already tuned into the dangers they see around them.

©John P. Richardson

The northwest winds we'll contend with today will be a nuisance everywhere but Hawk Ridge, where they'll drive migrating birds of prey right down into the waiting binoculars of the hawk counters.

Count Director and special guest star John Richardson joins us this morning to tell us more.

Lisa Johnson

Japan. Russia. Canada. Kurdistan.

Just a few of the countries whose relationship with the United States has become increasingly fraught in the last months, but also just a few of the countries with whom Duluth enjoys a sister-city relationship.

The chance for people here to connect to the wider world, to meet people who are simultaneously different from and the same as they -- those relationships could be seen as the antidote to fear.

Concerns about weather prompted a move to the DECC for today's International Day of Peace Celebration.

Sarah Stonich doesn't let go of things easily.

Or perhaps they just don't let go of her.

Even though she lives in the Twin Cities, northern Minnesota -- and the characters she's created who live there -- keep reappearing in her work.

Laurentian Divide is published by the University of Minnesota Press.

Project Consent

There's a national conversation taking place in our country now as the #metoo movement gathers momentum -- a conversation about consent.

But consent - what it is and, more importantly, what it's not - is an idea not limited to sexual encounters.

Superior Environmental Services Division/Facebook

People of a certain age remember when "don't litter," was at the forefront of everyone's consciousness.   

47 years after Keep America Beautiful's famous public service announcement admonished "people start pollution; people can stop it," it doesn't seem like we've gotten the message.

By some accounts, people fear public speaking more than death.

So while Duluth Mayor Emily Larson is glad folks who are comfortable getting up in front of a crowd at a City Council meeting are speaking up about their concerns, she wanted to continue another option.

In addition to connecting with different people in different neighborhoods, her "City Hall in the City" listening sessions are giving folks a chance to share concerns in a way that makes them more comfortable.

KUMD's Adam Reinhardt reports.

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