Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

Once again, the Duluth Superior Film Festival and AICHO will team up for the AICHO & DSFF Indigenous Film Screening Wednesday evening at 6:30pm.  

Award winning writer Linda Hogan is a Chickasaw poet, novelist, and essayist. She has written extensively on the natural world, and indigenous perspectives on nature and knowing.

Blink O'fanaye/Flickr

What is democracy?  Are its underpinnings being eroded?  Is it being threatened?  What, if anything can we do about it?

Peter Stenzel, John Munt, Philip Bouchard/Flickr

The first of the spring ephemerals have popped up in the woods, the vernal ponds are flourishing and things are greening and budding all over.

Larry Weber says the walk you take today won't be the same as yesterday's or tomorrow, so you'd better make sure to get out as often as possible.

Dr. Ben Santer's life changed that day he got a phone call from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), asking him to be the lead author of a chapter on the causes of climate change for the 1995 Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

The world changed the day these words were published: “the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate.”

Tom Kasper/Open Hands Food Project

Not even a week of rain can dampen Tom Kasper's enthusiasm for the Open Hands Food Project.

Last year, he donated over 2500 pounds of food to the Damiano Center over about three months.  This year he's thinking even bigger: weekly donations for 18 or 18 weeks.  More fruits and vegetables. Partnerships this year not just with the Damiano Center, but with local food initiatives like Second Harvest Food Bank, and the YMCA's meal program.

By Leonardo da Vinci - Getty Images, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=75787921

Maybe it's the rain and gloom, but Annie Dugan's thoughts are turning to the dark side of art these days. 

Chances are, if you pay $450 million dollars for a painting by Leonardo da Vinci, you expect it to actually be painted by da Vinci.

Find out more about the disappearing Salvator Mundi here: A Clash of Wills Keeps a Leonardo Masterpiece Hidden (New York Times, April 11)

©Lisa Johnson

“I don’t want you to get the impression we’re just putting you on a medicine to hide your problems. Having depression is more common than you know. Continuing to see the counselor is important. These medicines are safe and really have minimal side effects. They don’t make you look at the world through rose colored glasses and needing them is not a character flaw and taking them is not a sign of weakness.

Copyright JR Kelsey. Used with permission.

Close to a week of wind, rain, hail (!) and clouds is enough to dampen the mood of just about anyone.

Until, of course, you hear what Larry has to say about what these days have wrought in our world outside.

Mary Casanova knew that there was talent and artistry - and mental illness - in her gene pool.

So in her third Rainy Lake historical novel, she spent some time at the St. Peter State Hospital Museum, creating a character who was not only a talented painter - she'd been committed to an insane asylum by her family, a widespread practice at the time that pioneering journalist Nellie Bly wrote about first hand in 1887.

Johnny Silvercloud/Flickr

No one's particularly surprised to discover a big corporation or entity is lying to the public.

Actually, we kind of expect it.

But Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison is blowing past that kind of defeatism by filing suit last summer against Big Oil, charging they knew in the '60s about climate change, deliberately lied to Minnesotans about it, and made about $775 billion dollars in the process.

The fossil fuel companies had hoped to move their case to federal court, asserting that it was a suit about climate change and most appropriately tried there.

Public Domain/WikiCommons

It seemed unfair to have a poetry series celebrating poets who represent home to people who aren't "from here" originally and exclude Canadians.  So environmental and social justice advocate Jamie Harvie was pressed into double duty this morning.

NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Mars Perseverance rover carried the Ingenuity helicopter carefully to the red planet ... then set it down and "trundled away."

Undaunted, Ingenuity unfurled its solar panels, charged itself up and survived a brisk (-130 ℉) night alone.

Tim White/Facebook

Virtual opportunities to enjoy art abound again this week with a couple of in-person chances as well.

Fyn Kynd/Flickr

Welcome to Win-sprin, that strange little time of year between the melting of the snow and the greening of the forest floor.

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