Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

©Lisa Johnson/KUMD

Kym Young is a longtime human rights advocate in the Duluth/Superior community where she's worked for social justice and equal rights for marginalized groups.

  She's an elder, she's retired, and by her own admission, she's a vulnerable adult when it comes to COVID-19.

Sharon McCutcheon (l) and Joseph Ngabo (r)/Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic is turning out to be a lot more complicated than we thought.

How to stay safe and how to keep other people safe are complicated by issues of what safety really means: having a job? Being able to open your business?

Christies

If you'd set out to design two language with nothing in common, English and Chinese would be a couple of great candidates. 

English belongs to the Indo-European language family and its writing system is known as “Latin script.”  Chinese, on the other hand, comes from the Syno-Tibetan language family and its written language is logographic – symbols represent the words themselves, not letters like in alphabetic systems.

Stellarium

No problem seeing June's Strawberry Moon this week, and the twins Castor and Pollux are hanging out with Mercury in the eastern sky.

But  Venus has temporarily disappeared in the sun's glare. (Folks of a certain age may want to enjoy this flashback to John Stewart's album Bombs Away Dream Babies and one of the singles from that album,"Lost Her In The Sun")

shirien.creates/Instagram

This week, Annie Dugan brings us stories about how public art is how we cope with - and grieve - the death of George Floyd.

Who knew there was such a thing as the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture - but that they're not "the government"?

Lisa Johnson

Dr. Mary Owen sees many of the people around her just going about business as usual.

She admits she doesn't know if underneath, they're as upset and angry as she is or not.

The death of George Floyd last week has brought black and brown people together to protest a shared history of systemic racism, violence and death, and it's no surprise that Indigenous leaders and community members joined the protest and march Saturday afternoon in Duluth.

Jeremy Austin/Flickr

Take advantage of the breezy days; Larry Weber says the northwesterly winds this morning are doing a fine job of keeping the mosquitos and blackflies away.

There's also still time to catch the tail end of the first phase of wildflowers and the beginning of the second, plus frogs are calling, birds are nesting, turtles are laying eggs and you can't swing a dandelion without hitting a butterfly or dragonfly!

Lorie Shaull/Flickr

Edward Moody lived and worked as a TV reporter and news anchor in the Twin Ports - and the Twin Cities - for much of the 2000s. Now he's living in Georgia, an hour away from where Ahmaud Aubery's death came to light two weeks ago. In the wake of George Floyd's death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer this week, Edward is sharing his perspective on what it's like, as a black man, to live through these times.

University of Minnesota Duluth

Dr. Richard Buckalew of UMD is a mathematics professor at UMD, so unless you're pretty math-savvy yourself, things can veer off into the weeds pretty quickly.

But in addition to providing some infographics to help you better understand the math behind social distancing, he's got a lot of interesting things to say about the big differences small changes can make, and how to evaluate the news and claims crowding your social media feeds these days.

Scott Carpenter teaches French literature, literary theory, and cross-cultural studies at Carleton College in Northfield.

So when it came time for him to take a sabbatical, he thought, why not pack up my wife and teenage daughter and go live in Paris for a while?

"My guiding principle," says Carpenter, "was just to throw myself into situations that required meto do difficult things; things I didn't understand or predict how they'd end up."

Hamish Weir/Unsplash

Randy Hanson may be one of the go-to guys when it comes to talking about agriculture these days, but the co-director of Lake Superior College's Eco-Entrepreneurship Program wants people to to know that, COVID-19 or no COVID-19, climate change is still a reality.

Artem Beliaikin/Unsplash

The new neighbor in the Lincoln Park business is pretty much guaranteed a warm welcome.

The North Shore Federal Credit Union is using their grand-opening-celebration money to make mini-grants to neighboring businesses.

Chances are no one planned to buy masks, hand sanitizer, directional signs, and stickers for the floor to help customers stay six feet apart.  So the mini-grants are designed to help offset reopening costs after the mandated closures.

Young person wearing a face mask with artwork of animal fangs
American Indian Community Housing Organization/Facebook

Perhaps the reality of how much and how fast the world has changed didn't really start to sink in until you tried to figure out to have an online playdate for your toddler. Or how to explain to your (perhaps) startled child why everyone was walking around in masks.

Duluth has launched a project to get kids designing masks and talking about why people are wearing them. You can find more information about the program - and a template - here.

University of Minnesota Duluth

In one sense, John Bennett and the others at the University of Minnesota Extension's Center of Community Vitality are doing the same thing they've always done: gathering data, analyzing it, and providing it to the Northland in an easy-to-understand, accessible format.

Lisa Johnson

"Look at the lovely flowers that just came up in my garden!" gushed a novice gardener to Carol Andrews of the Arrowhead Chapter of Wild Ones.

"Goes to show weeds are pretty, too" came back the reply.

Would a weed by any other name be just as annoying?

Tom Kasper says you've got to establish your "weediness threshold."

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