Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

CDC/Unsplash

Katie Albert is St. Louis County's public health planner overseeing COVID-19 vaccination efforts.

She joins us this morning for a wide-ranging conversation about the County's progress through the first three phases of the highest priority groups for the vaccine, the need for volunteers, and how we find out who's next in line for the shots.

Copyright Bob King. Used with permission.

So much going on in the skies - if the clouds would just let up so we could see it!

Saturn and Jupiter and going their separate ways these days, but Mercury is waiting in the wings to console us for their loss.

We've intercepted a radio transmission from Proxima Centauri - communication or not?

No matter where you're physically located, you can enjoy the North House Folk School's Winter Virtual Film Fest from your couch, and maybe with a bowl of popcorn.

The film offerings change every week and you can find more information online here.

Otter photo Jason Mandich. Used with permission.

Maybe we're not quite at the point where we're crediting Mother Nature with actively looking out for us, but for those searching for rhyme, rime, or reason in these strange and terrifying times ... it's right outside.  

Andy Feliciotti/Unsplash

Yesterday afternoon's  internet and cell phone outage made it that much easier to sit in front of the TV, transfixed, by what was unfolding at the nation's Capitol.

UMD's Dr. Cindy Rugeley, head of the Political Science department, pulls no punches in her analysis of the events Wednesday.  Demonstrations by thousands of President Trump's supporters turned violent and a mob swarmed the Capitol building.  One person was shot and later died.

Winona LaDuke

The Minnesota Court of Appeals has no fewer than three requests to stay the Line 3 construction project, pending further consideration of what Frank Bibeau calls "the substantive issues."

Tom Kasper. Used with permission.

The 2021 Vegetable of the Year is the pea ... but even though they go in early,  it's a little bit yet before you can start planting.

However ... you can get started on your own mini-African violet farm right away.

Joshua Hoehne/Unsplash

Annie Dugan says she's not usually into making resolutions, but all the time with her family over the holiday and - face it - the last nine months or so has he resolving to set aside time for art on a regular basis.

You don't have to paint or sculpt; your "art time" might be looking at art.  But Annie's kind of intrigued by the intersection or art and other "cozy indoor activities" - like jigsaw puzzles, for instance.

Copyright Ivy Vainio. Used with permission.

  The cemetery is far from city lights and is surrounded by tall pine trees.  We are close to the same latitude as Finland and my grandmother would have seen the same winter constellations as a little girl in her homeland. 

We walk carefully so we don’t disturb the snow and we reverently place the candles on each grave.

December may give us the shortest days of the year, but it's packing a whole lot into those short days.

International Maritime Organization/Flickr

Invasive species are particularly hard on Minnesota, wreaking havoc on outdoor recreation, pumping stations and other infrastructure, and costing the Great Lakes $200 million a year.

But the EPA's proposed new ballast water standards, intended to limit the damage of invasive species but released in October to a mere 30 day public comment period, give lakers a free pass from having to treat ballast water.

Copyright Bob King. Used with permission.

The fabulous northern lights forecast for last week didn't materialize - the magnetic field was pointed the wrong way.

Then if you gave up on the Geminids last weekend and went to bed - the skies cleared around midnight.

But there's one last chance to see something cool and magical in the skies, and it's not only visible at a sensible hour, you have a window to see it of at least a week.

You can find more stargazing advice, stories and news at Astro Bob's Astronomy for Everyone.

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