Lisa Johnson

Morning Announcer

Lisa Johnson started her broadcast career anchoring the television news at her high school and spinning country music at KWWK/KOLM Radio in Rochester, Minnesota. She was a reporter and news anchor at KTHI in Fargo, ND (not to mention the host of a children's program called "Lisa's Lane") and a radio reporter and anchor in Moorhead, Bismarck, Wahpeton and Fergus Falls.

Since 1991, she has hosted Northland Morning on KUMD. One of the best parts of her job includes "paying it forward" by mentoring upcoming journalists and broadcasters on the student news team that helps produce Northland Morning.  She also loves introducing the different people she meets in her job to one another, helping to forge new "community connections" and partnerships.

Lisa has amassed a book collection weighing over two tons, and she enjoys reading, photography, volunteering with Animal Allies Humane Society and fantasizing about farmland.  She goes to bed at 8pm, long before her daughter, two cats, or three dogs.

Ways to Connect

Annie Dugan. Used with permission.

  A temporary, outdoor, public art sculptural installation … UNWEAVING explores the ways tradition, culture, communities, and individuals are unwoven when we are disconnected from our foundation of ancestral history (ie.when we don’t know our stories or when truths are suppressed or not acknowledged.) A different unweaving can loosen us from perpetuating unconscious pattern behaviors, make sense of our position in the larger social fabric, and enable reweaving a more honest and equitable future.

Artist Tia Keobounpheng says she came unraveled about six years ago.

But in the process of embracing "unweaving," she started asking herself questions like:

What would happen if I let go of binary labels like “good/bad” and “right/wrong” ?

What is keeping me from seeing all that I cannot see?

What happens if I let go of needing to be right?

The answers to those questions can be found - partly - in her new public art installation UNWEAVING.

Copyright Ivy Vainio. Used with permission.

I have no doubt this sewing machine made face masks over a hundred years ago and my grandmother would have made masks. There was a huge second wave of that pandemic and entire families died in a single day. They didn’t have access to ventilators back then and this machine would have been a life saver. My grandmother saved lives as a young woman and I never knew a thing about it.


The rain this week has been inconsistent. Larry says the National Weather Service in Duluth reports 3" of rain while he clocked 7" at his place a little further south.

But  whether it's thousands of nighthawks flowing by Hawk Ridge this week, flying ants, or avoiding falling acons, Larry says there are all kinds if changes consistently taking place in the natural world, as we get ready to say goodbye to Awesome August.

Thank heavens for Chico Bon Bon.

The irrepressible monkey with a tool belt embarks upon his sixth picture book adventure with calm, confidence, and the Right Tools.

Author and illustrator Chris Monroe talks about the book, and creativity in the time of pandemic.

The Blue Tax/Angie Frank

Why should pink pacifiers cost more than blue ones?  Why should women's disposable razors cost 13% more than men's?

You may not have heard of the so-called "pink tax," but chances are, you've paid it.  It costs woman over $1300 more a year, in fact. 

Angie Frank had a business creating personal care products from natural ingredients, so when customers asked for a beard oil, she developed one, charged 13% more for it ... and that's when the inspiration hit.

MPCA

Here's something more fun to think about than online learning or how to get kids to social distance: electric school buses.

The $2.9 billion dollar settlement the federal government reached with Volkswagen over the car maker's violation of emissions standards has meant, among other things, that Minnesota can spend $3 million dollars of its share on an electric bus pilot program.

Are electric school buses feasible in our double-digit-below-zero winter temperatures?

NASA/Bob King

Who can blame us if 2020's making us a little slap-happy?

Yes, there is an (itty-bitty) asteroid headed for Earth.

But it's only 6'6" - half the size of a Volkswagen Beetle.

If it actually hit the earth (and there's only a 0.41% chance of that, BTW), it would probably disintegrate and become ... asteroid dust.

And if that sounds beautiful, wait until you hear what else is coming up in the next few weeks.

Kezban Arca Batıbeki/ Instagram

  (This episode originally aired April 10, 2020)

Lisa Fitzpatrick speaks a lot of languages.

And she loves poetry.  In fact, she was the one who originally thought of a poetry feature on KUMD, sharing poetry in different languages.

But when she started thinking about a poem to read, herself, there was only one choice for her: Turkish.

This is a poem by Aşık Veysel called "Uzun İnce Bir Yoldayım"

Copyright Deb Holman. Used with permission.

Last week, the Twin Ports/Fond du Lac chapter of the American Indian Movement (AIM)marched to bring visibility to homelessness in Duluth. 

And visibility was the idea.  Everyone sees construction workers, says Phoebe Davis, a member of the city's Indigenous Commission (and a longtime KUMD volunteer), so marchers were clad in borrowed reflective vests.

Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay

Duluth Folk School classes, available for your small group, pod, or "love bubble" include building canoe paddles, tool boxes, or a rack for your ski jackets

2019 People's Choice Winners: Kid’s Choice – Ivan Gilbert, “Sea Turtle” Adult’s Choice – Toni Dachis, “Prince”Credit Minnesota State FairEdit | Remove

Kilarov Zaneit/Unsplash

The start of school is coming.  It's unavoidable.

Summer is winding down.  It's unavoidable.

But these days, dubbed "the Sad Days" by a school-age Larry Weber, now bring countless delights.

Mike Mayou

Widespread cutbacks in staffing and equipment at local post offices, ordered by the Postmaster General.

Former Minnesotan Linda Norlander calls Tacoma, Washington home these days, but she's still deeply tied to her roots in Pelican Rapids and memories of family trips to the North Shore and the BWCA.

She joins us to talk about the first in her series of "Cabin in the Lake" mysteries, and how she came to grips with some modern-day controversies in the process.

Copyright John P. Richardson. Used with permission.

When Larry Weber announced two weeks ago that the Hawk Ridge Raptor Count was starting this past Saturday (August 15), you could almost hear the groan of "No - already?"

The fact is, birds - and visitors - have been amassing at Hawk Ridge for awhile now.

Ironically, the fact that people aren't flying seems to mean they're more interested in watching birds who are.  The normally unflappable counters and other staff are looking at the August attendance - already way up - and trying to figure out how that will play out in September, and how they can keep everyone safe.

flowerpatchfarmhouse.com

Fall-based gardening?  Now?  It's the middle of August!

Luckily, a couple of the things you might consider doing in the garden are all about sharing: dividing irises, for example (if they haven't been blooming, or taking a page from Tom Kasper's book and dropping off 90 pounds of produce at the Damiano Center!

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