Northland Morning

Monday-Friday 6-9am

A mix of music to get you a great start on your day, plus fun features and interviews with a local perspective.

Weekly Schedule
6:08am | (M—F) 90 Second Naturalist
6:32am | Stardate
7:00am | (M) Minnesota Native News; (T—F) MN 90
7:08am | Earth Wise
7:32am | For the Birds with Laura Erickson
7:45am |(Th) Forever Home
8:00am | (M) Journey to Wellness/In the Spirit of Medicine; (T-F) Community Interviews
8:20am |
>> (M) Where's Art?
>> (T) Tips for Hardy Gardeners | The Sea Grant Files | Astro Bob's Backyard Astronomy (summer)
>> (W) Green Visions
>> (Th) MN Reads
>> (F) Backyard Almanac
8:40am | National Native News

Plant Image Library [Via Flickr]

Early spring leaves are beginning to emerge, but the forest floor wildflowers are soaking up as much sun as they can before being shaded by the leaf canopy. Warblers are beginning to return north in search of caterpillars, their spring food source, but the early leaf growth may cause caterpillars to cocoon before the warblers arrive. And a notable lack of rain yet in May has put the Northland back into a fire hazard condition.

© 2021 Paris Morning Publications

Rob Levine/Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy

The Minnesota Supreme Court's decision to  rescind PolyMet's permit to mine in essence, returned both mining and environmental advocates to their respective corners - but both are claiming victory.

PolyMet is hoping they can avoid hearings on the "upstream" mine waste dam and its majority owner, Glencore.

But environmentalists, who have found problems with additional project permits since 2018 are hoping this is a good place to stop, reassess and ask the hard question: Can this project move ahead legally at all?

USGS/Unsplash

The Climate Emergency Poetry Series' next event is May 16, and this, the eighth iteration, is the "out-of-towners" edition. 

Co-founder (with John Herold) Phil Fitzpatrick says he hopes participants and/or audience members get start "their own climate gig" in their communities" whatever it takes to get folks paying attention - and thinking.

Andrew Spencer/Unsplash

The weirdness of gravity (and you could jump higher on the moon),  and a chance to see bits and pieces of Halley's Comet tonight!

Plus Venus and Saturn return to the evening sky.

Sabishī/Flickr

If Larry has one piece of advice as April warms into May, it's: take a walk.  Every. Single. Day.

Freelance illustrator and University of Minnesota instructor John Owens didn't grow up heading to the Boundary Waters every summer, but once he went, he was hooked.

John Owens talked about how different artists capture inspiration, the fragility of stepping outside your comfort zone, and how you know when you have something good, this week on MN Reads.

John also mentioned a "teachable companion" to his book and you can find it here.

©Lisa Johnson

To kill, or not to kill?   That is the question—

Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The deer and rabbits of outrageous hunger,

Or to take arms against them in defence of the garden,

And, by opposing, end them?

(with apologies to William Shakespeare)

Art majors never dreamed their senior exhibitions would look like this.

And yet even as museums and galleries all over the country are casting about for options to packing people into their physical spaces, college students are making their exhibitions happen, pandemic or no pandemic.

Russ Allison Loar/Flickr

"I deserve to die alone, Dr. Vainio. I was never any kind of father and I stopped at the bar on my way home every time I got paid. I never took him to a park or swimming or to a fair. I wasn’t any better husband than I was a father. I told my wife she was the cause of my drinking. Maybe I was wrong,” he smiled grimly, “they’ve been gone for over thirty years.”

Sam Zimmerman

Sam Zimmerman is taking a class to re-learn his language, Ojibwemowin.

He laughs his efforts are making his ancestors' ears bleed, but if Sam's ancestors have been keeping track of him, chances are they're pretty proud.

Janet Riegle (tree swallows), JR Kelsey (hermit thrush, leopard frog), Lisa Johnson (pelicans, maple, sweet coltsfoot)

Despite days of clouds, rain, and even snow showers, the second half of unpredictable April has been a little short of precipitation.

Luckily, we got a great day yesterday to see all kinds of flora and fauna, and starting today we go back to cool, cloudy, and a chance of rain or snow into next week.

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