Northland Morning

Monday-Friday 6-9am

A mix of music to get you a great start on your day, plus fun features and interviews with a local perspective.

Weekly Schedule
6:08am | (M—F) 90 Second Naturalist
6:32am | Stardate
7:00am | (M) Minnesota Native News; (T—F) MN 90
7:08am | Earth Wise
7:32am | For the Birds with Laura Erickson
7:45am |(Th) Forever Home
8:00am | (M) Journey to Wellness/In the Spirit of Medicine; (T-F) Community Interviews
8:20am |
>> (M) Where's Art?
>> (T) Tips for Hardy Gardeners | The Sea Grant Files | Astro Bob's Backyard Astronomy (summer)
>> (W) Green Visions
>> (Th) MN Reads
>> (F) Backyard Almanac
8:40am | National Native News

Image courtesy of the Richard Henry Pratt Papers, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library/Wikimedia

For white Americans, the discovery of children's bodies in unmarked graves near Indian residential schools is awful - but not a surprise.

But again, for white Americans, this may be the first time they've heard of residential schools, even though Johnson says, "When any group of Indians is asked who had relatives taken, every single hand goes up."

No one asked the 19th century farmers how hard it was to harvest their crops on that day in 1888, but painting the scene apparently took an awful lot out of Vincent Van Gogh:

Lisa Johnson

Will we break the record for the driest July ever?

Between the heat and smoke from Canadian wildflowers, we haven't seen the sky in a while.  What's the moon up to these days?

Are wildflowers really changing again?

And where do we sign to have the goldenrod named as the National Flower? Is that even a thing?

Larry Weber has the answers this week on Backyard Almanac.

Carrie Chesnik/Rights of Mississippi River

It was supposed to be a chance for scientists, Indigenous organizers and leaders, and a broad swath of regional decision-makers at all levels to come together and see first-hand what the drought is doing to the lakes and rivers in northern Minnesota.

At issue is Enbridge's recent request to take almost five billion gallons of water as they work their way across the state with the Line 3 pipeline replacement project.

And with the most widespread drought areas in the state in eight years, those five billion gallons are looking more and more significant.

Then, in the middle of the tour, attendees came across a group of Enbridge employees working to clean up a frac-out - a spill of drilling fluid - in a wetland.

Jean-Raphaël Guillaumin/Wikimedia

Grasshoppers and potato bugs will damage your flowers and vegetables, yes.  But leaf hoppers, despite their tiny size, are the malarial mosquitos of the plant world.

Leaf hoppers can carry the aster yellows bacteria, and once a plant is infected, there's no saving it.

Lisa Johnson

As we slip into those lazy, hazy, crazy days of mid-summer, there's plenty to see whether we take a sidewalk stroll or hike in a wilderness area.

Watch for photographers: they've either got a bead on a beautiful plant, bird, animal or insect, or they're like naturalist (and our special guest host) Judy Gibbs and they're doing their part as citizen scientists and documenting the spread of invasive species in our area.

And while we know Duluth is a great place to live, why does valerian think so, too?

Imagine a couple of college kids, out in the middle of the night, trying to figure out how to catch loons.

Fraternity pledging, Northern Minnesota-style?

Actually: grad-school project.

Jim Paruk joins us this morning to share the story of how one night's work helping out a friend set the course of his life.

Cristian Ibarra Santillan/Flickr

Phil Fitzpatrick and John Herold wanted people educated - and fired up to take action - about climate change.

They took an unconventional approach: engender action through ... poetry.

The folks concerned about rezoning a chunk of land off Vassar Street in the Woodland neighborhood aren't opposed to more housing going up;  they just aren't sure right above the Amity Creek watershed is the right place for it.

Bob King

The forest fire smoke from Canada that has enveloped our region with haze in the last several days has made for colorful sunrises and sunsets (and reddish moonlight as well), but it has also limited the ability to stargaze. Bob King remarked that, the other night (which was cloudless but hazy), he could only count six stars in the night sky.  

Kirsten Aune

Kirsten Aune Textiles will host a fashion show on Saturday, July 17th, featuring apparel made from Aune's hand-printed fabrics, paired with shoes crafted by Candace Lacrosse of Hemlocks Leatherworks and earrings crafted by Hattie Peterson of Tumbled Hearts Design.

Minnesota Historical Society

This week, we had two days of temperatures above 90° -- and then Brimson almost broke the record with a low of 30°.

But nothing tops the week of July 7-13 in 1936, when the entire country sweltered under a series of heat waves. 17 of the 48 contiguous states and two Canadian provinces tied or broke their all-time heat records and many of those records are still unbroken.

In Duluth, six of those records still stand: doubly impressive when you learn temperatures were only recorded by the lake in those days.

Fabrice Florin/Flickr

There's nothing quite like the energy of young people these days.

Whether fueled by passion, anger, or love of the planet, they're fired up, tech-savvy and not afraid to use their powers for good.

Pages