Annie Dugan

Aaron Kloss

It feels like at least six years in Pandemic Time ... but in actuality it's only been six months. 

But artists have been hard at work responding to these times through their art, trying to figure out how to survive financially, and how to maintain their creative and economic health.

Some are doing a canvas a day to keep their artistic and marketing chops honedd, but even if you're not an artist yourself, Annie Dugan is suggesting you take a look at your social media feed through the lens of art.

Between working from home and schooling at home, most of us feel we're winning if we have clean sweatpants.

But pandemic or no, artists gotta art, and you can see more of what a handful of local folks have been up to here. 

And if you're not feeling your social media feed these days, don't start "unfriending" quite yet.

Just start adding museums and artists to your favorites list and watch your feed blossom into a thing of beauty.

Annie Dugan. Used with permission.

  A temporary, outdoor, public art sculptural installation … UNWEAVING explores the ways tradition, culture, communities, and individuals are unwoven when we are disconnected from our foundation of ancestral history (ie.when we don’t know our stories or when truths are suppressed or not acknowledged.) A different unweaving can loosen us from perpetuating unconscious pattern behaviors, make sense of our position in the larger social fabric, and enable reweaving a more honest and equitable future.

Artist Tia Keobounpheng says she came unraveled about six years ago.

But in the process of embracing "unweaving," she started asking herself questions like:

What would happen if I let go of binary labels like “good/bad” and “right/wrong” ?

What is keeping me from seeing all that I cannot see?

What happens if I let go of needing to be right?

The answers to those questions can be found - partly - in her new public art installation UNWEAVING.

Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay

Duluth Folk School classes, available for your small group, pod, or "love bubble" include building canoe paddles, tool boxes, or a rack for your ski jackets

2019 People's Choice Winners: Kid’s Choice – Ivan Gilbert, “Sea Turtle” Adult’s Choice – Toni Dachis, “Prince”Credit Minnesota State FairEdit | Remove

Cameron Radford/Communications Biology

Juliana Louis Pierson, Countess de Castiglione, c. 1860, albumen print (Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY)Credit FlickrEdit | Remove

The Metropolitan Museum of Art's celebration of 150 years opens in person at the end of the month, but you can take part virtually - with coffee in hand! - and explore the museum's history and how its role has changed over the years. 

Despite the difficulties in accessing many art galleries in these difficult days, Annie tells us about two great opportunities to interact with art this week online.

The Kenspeckle Letterpress/Facebook

The Kenspeckle Letterpress and Warrior Printress are closing their brick-and-mortar store in Canal Park.  Rick Allen and Marion Lansky are downsizing themselves back to their original printshop studio, and Warrior Printress will be relocating to Lincoln Park.

Adam Swanson

There are several ways to get an art break in your day this week.

One is a real, live, in-person (albeit masked and physically-distanced) art opening, as Adam Swanson's new exhibit at the Great Lakes Aquarium takes a look at animals on the federal threatened and endangered species lists.  The Mirrors by Adam Swanson art reception opens tomorrow (Tuesday, July 28) at 6:00pm.

AICHO/Facebook

“I want death to find me planting my cabbages, but careless of death, and still more of my unfinished garden.”

 - Michel de Montaigne

Red Lake Nation Ojibwe artist Robert DesJarlait has a lot going on, but he really loves those words from Michel de Montaigne.

DesJarlait, a writer, artist, traditional dancer, and gardener is showing his recent watercolor/mixed media paintings in a virtual exhibition and at AICHO through September.

Kari Halker-Saathoff/Duluth Art Institute

The Duluth Art Institute has reopened and they have some exhibits up.  Folks who come into the Depot are, of course, asked to wear masks and social-distance.

Kari Halker-Saathoff: Odysseus & Penelope: The Long Journey

Downtown Duluth Arts Walk/Facebook

Springboard for the Arts is an organization that connects artists with resources to make a living, but they're not forgetting the rest of us.

A recent mailer features this invitation:

Blackbird Revolt

"Après" zine from Blackbird Revolt:

APRÈS is a zine we created to honor Elias Clayton, Elmer Jackson, and Isaac McGhie.  However, as we were crafting the zine, the police murdered George Floyd. We were devastated. This murder followed the murders of Ahmaud and Breonna. We were overwhelmed and trying to figure out how to act while processing the pain and constant struggle of being Black in this environment.

Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona/Unsplash

There are a couple interesting online events today:

Make it Matter: Actions for Advancing Equity

Monday, 15 June 202012:00 PM-12:55 PMFacing the Truth About Racial Disparities Wednesday, 17 June 202012:00 PM-12:55 PMOwning Your Cultural Integrity Friday, 19 June 202012:00 PM-12:55 PMTaking Action to Destroy Disparities

Eli Brody/Flickr

Museums were already in a time of transition before the coronavirus pandemic shut them down and death of George Floyd brought racism and other "colonial" attitudes - like "cultural looting" - to the forefront of the public consciousness.  How to move forward; how to listen and reevaluate is the challenge now. (Major U.S. Museums Criticized for Responses to Ongoing George Floyd Protests)

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