Annie Dugan

Duluth Art Institute/Blair Treuer

We perhaps spend more time staring at screens than we did last year at this time, but there's more to enjoy than just work and school stuff.

Mike Shaw Photography

Prepare to be star-struck this week.

Begin with a week of activities courtesy the Bell Museum's Statewide Star Party starting tonight.  (Click the link for the full rundown of programs)

Fans of Svengoolie (in the Twin Ports on Saturday nights) will be thrilled to know that we're contributing our own unique brand of horror to the canon with the debut of Uncle Clutch’s Video Horror Shop. 

MCBA/Facebook

A little snow on the ground: not enough to play in but too much to ignore.

So we turn inward, perhaps, to books.

Friday (October 23) is the MCBA Prize Reveal and a Live Artist Talk at the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, which you can attend in your sweats and with a snack, if you wish.

And if that whets your appetite, you can find out about their extensive offering of virtual workshops on their website.

Jeff Kalstrom's E.is the A. A.is the W. opened at The Nordic Center last week ...  you can visit it in person as long as you observe the customary keeping-each-other-safe protocols, or enjoy it virtually.

Local art come roaring back this week with some live and virtual exhibitions:

First up, Jonathan Thunder and Robb Quisling open Aqua Vitae, Thursday October 8 at the Kruk Gallery on the UWS campus

Springboard for the Arts

If you think a CSA box of vegetables is fun, imagine a box of art every few months!

For the first time in five years, Springboard for the Arts has brought back their CSA "Comfort, Care and Craft" art boxes, and they go out beginning this winter.

Which means they're in the "request for proposals" stage, looking for artists/creators.  You can get all the information here.

St. Paul & Minnesota Foundation/Facebook

  The mural project in Duluth's Lincoln Park, at 2024 W 3rd Street on 21st Avenue West, is finally done, and Moira Villiard is pretty excited about it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

She writes:

Aaron Kloss

It feels like at least six years in Pandemic Time ... but in actuality it's only been six months. 

But artists have been hard at work responding to these times through their art, trying to figure out how to survive financially, and how to maintain their creative and economic health.

Some are doing a canvas a day to keep their artistic and marketing chops honedd, but even if you're not an artist yourself, Annie Dugan is suggesting you take a look at your social media feed through the lens of art.

Between working from home and schooling at home, most of us feel we're winning if we have clean sweatpants.

But pandemic or no, artists gotta art, and you can see more of what a handful of local folks have been up to here. 

And if you're not feeling your social media feed these days, don't start "unfriending" quite yet.

Just start adding museums and artists to your favorites list and watch your feed blossom into a thing of beauty.

Annie Dugan. Used with permission.

  A temporary, outdoor, public art sculptural installation … UNWEAVING explores the ways tradition, culture, communities, and individuals are unwoven when we are disconnected from our foundation of ancestral history (ie.when we don’t know our stories or when truths are suppressed or not acknowledged.) A different unweaving can loosen us from perpetuating unconscious pattern behaviors, make sense of our position in the larger social fabric, and enable reweaving a more honest and equitable future.

Artist Tia Keobounpheng says she came unraveled about six years ago.

But in the process of embracing "unweaving," she started asking herself questions like:

What would happen if I let go of binary labels like “good/bad” and “right/wrong” ?

What is keeping me from seeing all that I cannot see?

What happens if I let go of needing to be right?

The answers to those questions can be found - partly - in her new public art installation UNWEAVING.

Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay

Duluth Folk School classes, available for your small group, pod, or "love bubble" include building canoe paddles, tool boxes, or a rack for your ski jackets

2019 People's Choice Winners: Kid’s Choice – Ivan Gilbert, “Sea Turtle” Adult’s Choice – Toni Dachis, “Prince”Credit Minnesota State FairEdit | Remove

Cameron Radford/Communications Biology

Juliana Louis Pierson, Countess de Castiglione, c. 1860, albumen print (Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY)Credit FlickrEdit | Remove

The Metropolitan Museum of Art's celebration of 150 years opens in person at the end of the month, but you can take part virtually - with coffee in hand! - and explore the museum's history and how its role has changed over the years. 

Despite the difficulties in accessing many art galleries in these difficult days, Annie tells us about two great opportunities to interact with art this week online.

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