Annular Eclipse

© Bob King. Used with permission.

Bob King is back from his flight in search of the annular eclipse, and not only did he get spectacular pictures, he's written a whole article about it.

Find out about the flight and the eclipse in his article, "Chasing the Sun at 39,000 Feet," in Sky & Telescope magazine.

Another viewing/photo opportunity is much closer to home and you don't even need any special gear.  Just head out to an unobstructed view of the northern horizon about 10pm and look up into the mesosphere (about 50 miles up) and you may see the pale blue of noctilucent clouds.

©Bob King. Used with permission.

While disgruntled local weather watchers clambered out of bed early Thursday morning, only to be greeted by clouds instead of a (safe) peek at the annual eclipse, Bob King was almost 40,000 feet up in the air, far above the clouds and just about everything else, on his first eclipse flight.

He was invited on the 2021 Annual Eclipse Flight by Sky & Telescope magazine.  Enjoy his description and photos of the flight on their website, here.

Paul Hanaoka/Unsplash

All kinds of great stargazing awaits as we move toward the weekend:

Friday, June 19: the crescent moon has a rendezvous with the crescent Venus  around 4:30am...

Saturday, June 20: you can see a whole string of SpaceX satellites at 3:26 am (yup, there's an app for that), and the sun reaches its highest point in the sky at 4:44pm  ...