Birds

Seabrooke Leckie/Flickr

The Child is adorable ... but you won't find him/her/them on your local neighborhood, Governor-sanctioned outdoor traipses.

What you can look for, though, is The Infant.

55Laney69/Flickr

So far, August is shaping up to be July ... at 50% intensity, or something.

It's been warmer than normal (but not as much as last month) and drier than normal (but not as much as last month).

"Awesome August," as Larry calls it, does have it's own unique charms, too: like it's own wildflowers, the earlier wildflowers going to seed, and an abundance of animals, birds and insects on the move.

Ruth Hartnup

Today, July 12, Larry Weber recounts how July in full swing with hot weather with less then desirable rainfall.  However, big summertime storms can bring rainfall measurements back in line in just a few hours.

This time of year is good for wildflowers, berries, birds, insects which means lots of spiders, and beautiful spider webs.  In July we also are in butterfly, moth and dragonfly season.

Other highlights include and of course great Jupiter viewing and plentiful fireflies.

Stephanie Brown/Flickr

We've got daylight from 5:15am to 9:00pm this month, and from fireflies to songbirds to butterflies, dragon flies, frogs, wildflowers and trees, Mother Nature is taking advantage of every single second.

©MN Department of Natural Resources

April left and took the snow with her, says Larry Weber.

But the lack of moisture in many spots, plus the breezy conditions, means a high fire danger.

Larry Weber with a wrap up of April stats (three times as much snow, but precipitation still below normal), the migrants who've shown up just in the last week, and happy news on the frog front.

©Laura Erickson. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Listeners to Laura Erickson's For the Birds program this morning heard about the plight of our early arrivals in the Northland - and it's not good news.

In case you missed it, here is the contact information Laura shared on the program:

REGI (Raptor Education Group of Antigo) at 715-623-4015

Locally, you can reach Wildwoods at 218-491-3604

Jason Crotty/Flickr

Larry Weber says he can go years between sightings of northern birds like Black-backed Woodpeckers and Red Crossbills.

But he's seen plenty of them this year, along with a number of wild turkeys who have discovered his feeders.

Animal Tracks in Snow
offthegridnews.com

Today Larry Weber talks about recent weather and "gray November" has proven to be true this month.

He also gives a list of Nothern birds he has seen around as well as animal tracks in the snow.   

     

WIldwoods Rehabilitation

How could anyone with a heart resist an "abandoned" fawn or a baby bird flopping helplessly on the ground?

The compassion isn't the problem at this time of year; the problem is what you don't know you don't know in order to really help.

Luckily for us, Wildwoods is there - on the phone or online - to help.

©Lisa Johnson

We're seeing the "effect" in "lake effect" this week ... but late season snows make it tough on birds and animals, returning migrants and winter-long residents.

Fyn Kynd Photography [via Flickr]

Larry Weber talks about the return of the cold temperatures - not really as unseasonable as people may think - as well as the return of many migrating birds, and other signs that, regardless of the cold snap, spring will be here soon.

©Bird Watching Daily

UMD's Dr. Gerald Niemi has seen a lot of changes in the St. Louis River since he began researching birds and their habitat there in the '70s.

Anita Ritenour

Author and naturalist Larry Weber observes the final week of summer, noting the warmer temps (10 degrees above average for September!).  The leaves are already starting to change: Maples, sumacs, dogwoods are turning red, but so are Virginia creeper and poison ivy. Yellow leaves to look out for are the ash, birch and poplar trees. Birds are migrating – this is "hawk weekend" in the Duluth area.  Geese and cranes are in motion, as are the warblers, thrushes and flickers, among others. 

nancybeetoo (via Flickr)

  Author and naturalist Larry Weber notes how the late summer rains have brought an abundance of mushrooms. Glowworms have been out and about.  The trees are starting to change color as fall moves in, and with fall comes the migration of birds – some say the greatest in recent memory.  Both raptors (hawks, eagles) and non-raptors (Canada geese, warblers and blue jays, et al.) have been sighted. Snakes too!

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