Climate Change

The last time we checked in with Tone Lanzillo, the environmental activist was walking from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C.

His walk, to raise awareness about climate change and what he calls "The Duluth Agreement," is over but it's leading right into his next project, "Making It Personal."

If you'd to take part in Tone Lanzillo's "Making It Personal" project, you can email him here.

Sea Change/Amicus Adventure Sailing

What is the sailor's perspective on climate change - even here on the shores of our "inland sea"?

Lots of "arrs" -- actually, Rs: recycle, reuse, regift, recover ...

The Sailor's Perspective on Climate Change event will be tomorrow (May 8) at 7:00pm.  More information is here.

David B. Young/Flickr

Don't try to tell Mary Franz that individuals can't affect the trajectory of climate change.

The organizing director of MPIRG at UMD says all our decisions matter.

And if we look for them, we can see the components of change all around us.

The Our Planet, Our Future: Environmental Summit will be held March 28; you can find more information here.

Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy

Up until recently, the climate change conversation was conducted by scientists, and accompanied by lots of charts, graphs, and data.

But Jothsna Harris of Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy says most people aren't scientists.  And she thinks we need to shift the conversation away from people's heads ... and toward their hearts.

Duluth Snow
Sharon Mollerus

The climate in Minnesota is changing.

What will this mean for North Shore visitors on the hunt for recreational activities?

MN Sea Grant

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes says it takes about a hundred years for people to transition from one energy source to another -- no matter how appealing the new energy source might be.

But do we have that kind of time?

KUMD's Adam Reinhardt has the story.

Energy: A Human History is published by Simon & Schuster.

[This story originally aired on November 21, 2018, and was re-aired on December 26, 2018.]

Lake Superior
Ed Menendez

Jesse Schomberg and Tom Beery talk climate adaptation this week on the Sea Grant Files.

Duluth is facing three major climate challenges: warmer and wetter weather, losing the winter cold, and more frequent and high intensity storm events.

How do we combat these climate challenges and what does this mean for our community?

MN Sea Grant

©Lisa Johnson

"Limiting global warming to 1.5ºC would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society,"  according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in a new assessment that came out, ironically, four days before yet another October storm on Lake Superior decimated the Lakewalk in Duluth.

Peoples Climate Movement

Next month's Duluth Peoples Climate March will be more than an effort to educate folks about climate change.

©Lisa Johnson

What do Minnesotans like in the summertime?

Lots of things.  Many involving lakes, dogs and ... beer.

So if something comes along that threatens those things ... well, them's fightin' words.

Inter-Tribal Maple Syrup Producers Cooperative/Facebook

Maybe it's hard to really internalize what rising ocean levels, for instance, mean when you live in the middle of the country.

But the effect climate change could have on the maple syrup we make every spring?

That's something to pay attention to,

Karen Holland/US Environmental Protection Agency

Tom Beery is an enthusiastic guy to begin with, but kicking off a two-day workshop on adaptation planning for coastal communities - on Duluth's Climate Adaptation Day, no less - you get the feeling that he just can't wait to get started.

"We don't have to argue the specifics of climate change," he says.  "We're experiencing change, and we can look at it from a readiness perspective."

This week on The Sea Grant Files, guest host Sharon Moen welcomes Dr. Thomas Beery, Minnesota Sea Grant coastal resilience specialist to talk about creating infrastructure with climate change in mind.  In the wake of so many weather related disasters during this hurricane season, preparing for a different climate future has been a big topic of conversation lately.  What does this look mean for Minnesota? Listen for more about green, blue-green and gray infrastructure and for more information to hear Dr. Beery speak at UMD.

When the conversation turns to climate change, there's not much good or hopeful news.

And most people find the idea of global warming too big, too complicated, too wide-reaching - so  instead of engaging, they just shut down.

Jodi Slick, founder and CEO of Ecolibrium3 here in Duluth, says the local level is where we have our best opportunities to address climate change.

Open Books

Our guest on this episode of MN Reads is Lorin R. Robinson, the author of Tales From The Warming published in 2017 by Open Books.

Combining scientific fact with narrative fiction, the book is a collection of 10 short stories set in the near future at different locations around the globe.  Robinson's characters struggle to manage, mitigate, or at least come to grips with inevitable change due to the effects of global warming in their environments.

Pages