Coronavirus

Yoshiyasu Nishikawa/Flickr

(This episode originally aired March 31, 2020)

Maybe you want to use this time at home to learn a new skill.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to start healthier habits.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to figure out how to keep your family out of your hair.

Whatever your plan, Arlene Coco has a suggestion for that.

xiao zhou from Getty Images

Sometimes you just can't win.

As public health officials watched the COVID-19 pandemic play out on the east and west coasts, they encouraged us here in the Midwest to social distance and wear masks.

Eli Brody/Flickr

Museums were already in a time of transition before the coronavirus pandemic shut them down and death of George Floyd brought racism and other "colonial" attitudes - like "cultural looting" - to the forefront of the public consciousness.  How to move forward; how to listen and reevaluate is the challenge now. (Major U.S. Museums Criticized for Responses to Ongoing George Floyd Protests)

University of Minnesota Duluth

Dr. Richard Buckalew of UMD is a mathematics professor at UMD, so unless you're pretty math-savvy yourself, things can veer off into the weeds pretty quickly.

But in addition to providing some infographics to help you better understand the math behind social distancing, he's got a lot of interesting things to say about the big differences small changes can make, and how to evaluate the news and claims crowding your social media feeds these days.

©Lisa Johnson

Looking around, it's hard to know where to start.

Worries and fears about physical safety, economic safety - your kids, your parents, your job ...

Locally Laid Egg Company and Sebastian Dumitru/Unsplash

Maybe you can't hoard eggs.  But they're - pardon the expression - flying off store shelves as more and more people are cooking and baking.

So even though they're busy selling all the eggs they can produce, Jason and Lucie Amundsen of Locally Laid Egg Company hit on another idea to help local folks interested in urban agriculture.

Duluth Art Institute

The Duluth Art Institute is announcing Response. a spring 2020 online exhibition presenting work - completed or in progress - that's a response to our current situation.

The DAI is also looking toward the future with optimism and inviting artists to submit proposals for the 2021 exhibition season.  More information about the application and proposal process is here.

Zoongide’iwin is the Ojibwe word for courage and this is one of our grandfather teachings. Zoongide’iwin means to do what is right when the consequences are unpleasant, to do what is right even when you’re afraid.

This is the time for courage. This is the time to stay strong. The virus is depending on you to bring it to others and we cannot let that happen if we can help it.

©Lisa Johnson

The news that a pair of cats in New York came down with with COVID-19 and a pug in North Carolina did, too, has animal-lovers worried for the safety of our dogs and cats.

The bad news: if they're going to get it, chances are, they will get it from us.

The good news: they're probably not going to get it.

GoToVan/Flickr

People interpret the information about COVID-19 and/or the economy depending on how these things affect them.

  Is there any way to get close to an objective method to weigh these two competing interests?  How should we be thinking about this?  How should we be parsing the information we get about both issues?

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College/Facebook

Most students, parents, and teachers aren't huge fans of distance learning, but for Indigenous students and tribal colleges, it's alot more than just a nuisance.

Tamas Tuzes-Katai/Unsplash

Dr. Glenn Simmons Jr. has an analogy about the COVID-19 pandemic and organ donation.

But it's not the stretch it might seem.

There are laws against selling your own organs, he explains, because the people most likely to do so are already the people with the fewest resources.

Minnesota's Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan said last week, “I think we’ve heard some say that COVID-19 is the great equalizer, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. What this crisis has done is lay bare the inequities that already existed within our state.”

Fusion Medical Animation/Unsplash

Last week's announcement by the World Health Organization that "there's no evidence shows that having coronavirus prevents a second infection" is a big deal, because almost all of our ideas of how "moving forward" looks are predicated on the assumption that people who have had the virus are "safe to resume normal life."

Dayne Topkin/Unsplash

The good news is that a second round of PPP (Paycheck Protection Program) funding for small businesses opened Monday.

The bad news is that some of the same problems - like an overloaded system - are still being experienced.

Some more good news is that St. Louis County announced this morning it's been allocated over $2 million dollars in special allocations from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and if there's a little bad news mixed in, like uncertainty about how the money needs to be spent ... well, let's just focus on the good news for a little.

Mubariz Mehdizadeh/Unsplash

If you suffer from a mental illness like anxiety or depression, chances are you have several tools in your toolbox to help you cope and get back to a healthier state of mind.

But what if you've been fine your whole life - until now - and you're wondering why the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic are turning you into someone you don't recognize?

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