Eclipse

M. Druckmüller / P. Aniol / K. Delcourte / P. Horálek / L. Calçada / ESO

Chances are you'll miss today's total eclipse of the sun unless you're in Argentina, but even if you can't see it in person, there are plenty of ways to enjoy the experience, virtually.

Plus lots of things you can see, 

©Bob King. Used with permission.

It's a moon.  It's a shadow. (Yup, now you'll have the Cat Stevens tune stuck in your head all day, too.)

But it's also 365 degrees of sunrises and sunsets, and that, friends, is pure poetry.

And, as promised, here's everything you wanted to know and more about what, where and how to watch the eclipse in our area:

Kristina Estell

Erika Mock and Kristina Estell are co-hosting a Pop-Up Shop and Open Studio Thursday at 12 N 21st Avenue W (look for watercolor paintings of bubble wrap).

Artists and non-artists alike can register for The Artist as Cultural Producer workshop September 9 at the Duluth Art Institute ...

Jared Smith [via Flickr]

Naturalist Larry Weber observes that so many things are happening in nature this week, from the mushrooms down low to the ground all the way up to the Perseids and the upcoming solar eclipse.  The rainfall totals for August (and the summer) are above normal. The hawks and ospreys will soon be on the move over Duluth, many insects are maturing, and the blackberries are ripening too.

Everyone is talking about the solar eclipse, occurring Monday across the north American continent.  In the Duluth area, it will not be total eclipse, a mere 80% coverage of the moon over the sun, but that is still a spectacular event to see.

Eclipse 2017/NASA

Larry Weber says the difference between viewing a total eclipse and a partial eclipse is - literally - the difference between night and day.

But if a trip to the totality isn't in your plans, there are lots of ways to enjoy the eclipse, stay safe and even a helpful list of places who might be able to set you up with good eclipse-viewing optics.

Goddard Science Visualization Studio, NASA

First, we've got a full moon August 7.  Then the Perseid meteor shower August 11-13.

Then the "eclipse of the century" on August 21, 2017.

No wonder Larry Weber thinks August is awesome!