Enbridge

Honor the Earth

Winona LaDuke is angry, and she's not pulling any punches.

Enbridge is prepared to begin construction on the controversial Line 3 project next Tuesday, and LaDuke, a longtime environmental activist and the executive director of Honor the Earth, is fed up.

"This is a disaster for the environment, civil rights and the government," she says.  "The least the governor could do is issue a stay.

"We would like the dogs called off. Enbridge wants to push this through before the pandemic is over and in the middle of winter. And that's wrong."

Honor the Earth

Honor the Earth's  third annual "Love Water, Not Oil" tour continues across Northern Minnesota, a journey by horse and canoe along the proposed new Sandpiper/Line 3 oil pipeline corridor.

Honor the Earth is a Native-led environmental organization formed in 1993 by activist and environmentalist Winona LaDuke of White Earth  and Indigo Girls Amy Ray and Emily Saliers.

The tour comes at a time when many Native communities are not only questioning the pipeline proposals, but challenging the state's rights to regulate ricing and fishing in defiance of the 1855 Treaty.

Enbridge

Enbridge Energy's proposed Sandpiper oil pipeline is drawing the ire of yet another group - this time, the National Congress of American Indians is weighing in, and they want the EPA and the US Army Corps of Engineers to address not just the environmental impact of the project, but what they see as threats to tribal sovereignty, religious freedoms, and federally protected resources of the region's indigenous peoples.