Environment & Outdoors

Jim/Flickr

It seems we're at sixes and sevens these days.

Beginning Sunday, our sunrises begin before 7:00am - 14 days later they bounce back to just before 6:00am.

Rainy City/Flickr

Where have all the flowers gone? sang Pete Seeger.

Girls have picked them, every one...

  Yes, but did you know they were eating them?

Puppies: PentaxianK1ii/Flickr, Plants: Markus Spiske/Unsplash

If you want to share the miracle of life with your kids, you don't need to let them watch the birth of puppies or kittens.  You can get them set up to watch brand new seeds sprouting quickly and inexpensively - and tiny plant shoots don't claw the couch!

Ales Krivec/Unsplash

I always consider being a doctor the peak of the mountain in the medical field. It makes a difference where you started from when you’re standing on that peak. Some start from the deepest of valleys and it’s those students who need the most help and the most support. 

JLS Photography Alaska/Flickr

Copyright Ivy Vainio. Used with permission.

Refineries, paper mills, wastewater plants, lumber companies, paint factories, steel furnaces, and meat-packing plants all lined the St. Louis River Estuary at one point, and, before it was illegal to do so, dumped their waste directly into the river.

Full Moon over Lake Superior
Bob King

The only good thing about nights where the air temperature is -20 and the wind chill is worse is that you can be pretty sure the skies will be clear for star-gazing.

Venus, Mars and the "precious" nature of night vision this week on Astro Bob's Backyard Astronomy.

Greg Schechter [via Flickr]

Larry Weber notes that the February snows are, as usual, light and dry; not much has fallen in the past couple weeks.  The warm temps that gave way to the cold temps have created a crusty layer of snow on top of the deep snow pack.  While this is not so much fun for deer whose legs have to punch through it, it is great for lighter, smaller animals like the fox who now can walk across the top of it.

Nadine Shaabana/Unsplash

The journey of  a thousand miles begins with a single step.

Likewise the journey of a thousand steps to sustainability and quality-of-life goals for Minnesota cities and towns has been curated down to a mere 175. 

GreenStep Cities is a free, voluntary program that helps cities work at their own pace to make and achieve sustainability goals.  You can see how Duluth is doing here.

Gabriel Jimenez/Unsplash

Listening to this morning's episode of The Simple Plate, Tom Kasper started thinking about how growing our own food can have an impact on our economic lives, social issues, environmental issues ... and our psychological as well as physical health.

Finland Lakeland/Flickr

"Every step was squishy."

That's how Larry Weber described his own lake walk this past week. 

Luckily the ice is fundamentally thick enough not to break through, but it's covered with a layer of slush that does make travel difficult.

Larry wraps up a remarkable January (remarkable because it wasn't), ponders how warm it will actually get this weekend, reminisces about the -60 in Tower back on Feb. 2, 1996 and observes some signs of spring.

©Lisa Johnson

John Stetson likes the Mineral Center checkpoint. 

The quiet turn-off in the woods, at the end of an 11 mile road and watched over by an old log cabin just feels good to him.  

With over 30 years of mushing and training sled dogs and 13 John Beargrease marathon races with a couple of mid-distance wins thrown in, John Stetson knows where the musher's heads are by the time they reach this last checkpoint before the Beargrease race finish.

NRRI

Tiffany Sprague is an excited person.

She's excited about science and communicating science.

She's excited about citizen science and the work people and businesses can do every day to manage stormwater.

She's excited that the University of Minnesota sees the need for effective communicators about science.

And she's excited about her new job/s that let her blend her knowledge with her enthusiasm.

Smiling man next to a large home telescope
Courtesy of Bob King

It's Beargrease week, so of couse we asked Bob to talk about Sirius, the dog star on this week's show.

Lisa Johnson

4:36 PM UPDATE: Ryan Redington crosses the finish line at 4:36:15 pm  to win his second John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon.  He previously won in 2018. 

Keith Aili arrived second, crossing the finish line at 4:50:11 pm.  Ryan Anderson is expected to cross within the hour, followed by Martin Massicotte. 

(previous) 2:00 PM UPDATERyan Redington is in the lead with about 40 km to go in the final leg of the 2020 John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon. 

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