Gary Boelhower

Yinan Chen/Pixabay

Several well-known poets, including Duluth's poet laureate, will join some lesser-known poets and musicians Sunday afternoon for Poets on the Water, a celebration of, not just lakes and streams, but all the ways in which our lives are sustained and touched by this most necessary of elements.

Sven van der Pluijm on Unsplash

Poet Mary Oliver wasn't "from here," but so many of us feel drawn to the work of the woman the New York Times called the "poet of the natural world."

  Mary Oliver died January 17.  All this week on Northland Morning, local poets will be sharing their favorite Mary Oliver poems

This morning Ellie Schoenfeld reads Mary Oliver's "Dogfish."

Lisa Johnson

Poet Mary Oliver wasn't "from here," but so many of us feel drawn to the work of the woman the New York Times called the "poet of the natural world."

Mary Oliver died January 17.  All this week on Northland Morning, local poets will be sharing their favorite Mary Oliver poems, and we began this morning with Duluth's Poet Laureate, Gary Boelhower, reading Mary Oliver's "Mindfulness":

By Rannpháirtí anaithnid at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0

KUMD's annual reveal of the Vegetable of the Year featured an ode to same by Duluth Poet Laureate Gary Boelhower, an introduction by the Duluth Community Garden Program, and turns out to be a cross between a cabbage and a turnip (??)!

VEGETABLE OF THE YEAR 2019

©John Heino

KUMD FUND DRIVE

Some things you can count on
The frayed shoe string
Will break on the morning
You are already late

The cup with the slight
Crack will shatter to pieces
When its full of morning coffee

The oatmeal will boil over
On the just-cleaned stove top

You’ll run out of dental floss
When the dark raspberry seeds
Are lodged in a most unsightly manner
Between your lovely front teeth

But you’ll turn on KUMD
And tune in to the sound of Lisa’s voice
Which always brings you back to steady

©Gary Boelhower

Duluth's newly-minted Poet Laureate  (not even 24 hours yet) for 2018-2020 shares his thoughts on making poetry "more a part of the everyday fabric of Duluth": everything from replacing new-business ribbon-cuttings with some poetry read to reflect on community, to starting city council meetings with a poem, perhaps, related to one of the agenda items.