George Floyd

It seems that the whole world took note of George Floyd's death, but the story of his death - and the protests that followed all across this country - wasn't being presented to everyone the same way.

Dr. Ryuta Nakajima, a UMD Professor of Art and Design, noticed his Japanese friends back home had a radically different perception of what was happening and why, so he took to social media to set some things straight.

Copyright Takashi Watanabe

UMD's Dr. Dana Lindaman pays a lot of attention to what's going on in contemporary culture.

He has a friend and colleague in France and the two men collaborate on analysis of the politics and myths in our cultures - Lindaman analyzing the French and Jerome Viala-Gaudefroy looking at the American.

Lindaman also has a beloved older brother who is Black.

Duluth Police Department

Duluth Police Chief Mike Tusken joins us in a candid and wide-ranging conversation about policing in these challenging times: the people they want to hire - and don't want to hire these days; the outrage, sorrow and embarassment of fellow police after the death of George Floyd, and the toll the unavoidable backlash takes on officers.

Plus he talks about the social workers already embedded within the department, the importance of School Resource Officers, and how a police union can work - and not work - for a police department and the community.

Nathan Dumlao/Unsplash

The St. Louis River Alliance has added their voice to the growing chorus of organizations taking a second look at their diversity and inclusiveness and seeing room for improvement.

Forest Simon, via Unsplash

Death has always been patient.  For some it comes after a long and full life with boats and vacations and mortgages and big weddings and handshakes and Christmas cards from bankers. It comes with friendly nods and gentle warnings for driving a few miles above the speed limit.

For others it comes randomly with agony and pain and humiliation for a twenty dollar mistake.

©Lisa Johnson/KUMD

Kym Young is a longtime human rights advocate in the Duluth/Superior community where she's worked for social justice and equal rights for marginalized groups.

  She's an elder, she's retired, and by her own admission, she's a vulnerable adult when it comes to COVID-19.

Sharon McCutcheon (l) and Joseph Ngabo (r)/Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic is turning out to be a lot more complicated than we thought.

How to stay safe and how to keep other people safe are complicated by issues of what safety really means: having a job? Being able to open your business?

shirien.creates/Instagram

This week, Annie Dugan brings us stories about how public art is how we cope with - and grieve - the death of George Floyd.

Who knew there was such a thing as the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture - but that they're not "the government"?

Lisa Johnson

Dr. Mary Owen sees many of the people around her just going about business as usual.

She admits she doesn't know if underneath, they're as upset and angry as she is or not.

The death of George Floyd last week has brought black and brown people together to protest a shared history of systemic racism, violence and death, and it's no surprise that Indigenous leaders and community members joined the protest and march Saturday afternoon in Duluth.

Lorie Shaull/Flickr

Edward Moody lived and worked as a TV reporter and news anchor in the Twin Ports - and the Twin Cities - for much of the 2000s. Now he's living in Georgia, an hour away from where Ahmaud Aubery's death came to light two weeks ago. In the wake of George Floyd's death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer this week, Edward is sharing his perspective on what it's like, as a black man, to live through these times.