Heat

Lisa Johnson/JR Kelsey

July has lost its crack at record-setting heat for the month, and its regained a couple of inches on the rainfall deficit.

But what it's losing in hours of daylight and birdsong in the morning, it's more than making up for in young birds and animals, the next batch of wildflowers, and, of course, berries.

Sankax/Flickr

Vernal ponds are drying up.

June will go down as one of the top five driest Junes in 150 years.

And now ... big spiders.*

Perhaps this quote from Dorothy Molter, the "Root Beer Lady" sums up these days best:

  "When it gets to be July, I look forward to the long cold nights of November."

*A note about this photograph

©Lisa Johnson

Larry Weber's not on social media, but its tentacles reached out to him anyway so he could answer the trending question: are there more white pelicans around here than usual for this time of year?

And here's some Phenology phenology: what we were talking about last year at this time:

Shelby L Bell [via Flickr]

Naturalist, author and educator Larry Weber, always a keen observer of what is, acknowledges an important anniversary.  

©John Krumm. Used with permission.

Temps like we've had the past few days remind us Duluth almost never gets hot.

But Larry Weber reminds us that 81 years ago, Duluth had a seven-day stretch of temperatures in the 90s or hotter, and three times the mercury hit 100 or above.

And if that's not bad enough, back in 1936, they were taking temperatures down by the lake.  Seriously.

KUMD Album Review: Heat

Feb 1, 2017
Heat

Overnight is an experiment with the minimalism rock was once synonymous with. Heat, a Montreal based rock band, has made their effort at bringing it back. 

Back in 1936 over a ten day period in July, Duluth set seven record high temperatures that still stand - including 106 on July 13.

And that was back in the days when they took the temperature readings down by the lake.

Uff-da.