Housing

Vin Crosbie/Flickr

We've come a long way from the days when Walter Cronkite, the anchorman of the CBS Evening News, was widely hailed as the "most trusted man in America."

Whether you blame the repeal of the Fairness Doctrine in 1987, the proliferation of the internet, or the shift from "journalists" to "content creators," separating truth from fiction - even as it pertains to those reporting or presenting "the news" has become impossibly complicated.

And at the same time, the most important work, that of local newspapers, radio and television, is disappearing bit by bit.

Ecolibrium3/Facebook

[This episode of Caring & Sharing originally aired on December 10, 2018, and was re-aired on December 28, 2018.] 

"Giving Comfort at Home" is the name of a specific program offered by Ecolibrium3: it's designed to help elderly, disabled and/or veteran home owners who may not be able to make needed energy-saving improvements.

Dennis Kempton/JTA

Minnesota's Historic Preservation Office says the state tax credit for rehabbing historic structures generates a lot of economic activity -- and almost four thousand jobs this year.

Problem is, this program is for big-ticket renovations of commercial properties. But offering incentives for people to renovate Duluth's existing housing stock would be a big win - for the environment and everyone who is struggling to find housing in our community.  

One Roof Community Housing/Facebook

Duluth has more than its share of challenges when it comes to affordable housing.

NRRI

The pilot project that St. Louis County and the NRRI are working on is a win-win.

Rachel Whyte/HGTV

It costs more to build a house than it used to, but Duluth's challenging terrain makes the numbers - and your head spin.

Blasting through bedrock to put in utilities and other infrastructure can add $80 thousand dollars to a project right off the top.

Solution?  One of the ideas identified at the 2014 Housing Summit was a page right from HGTV's book: fix up, renovate and modernize aging houses and get existing, foreclosed and condemned properties back on the market.

©Deb Holman

$530 dollars a month bought a lot more in 1986.

If that number kept up with the cost of living, it would be closer to $1,400 in 2016 dollars.

But 30 years later, a family of three on MFIP (The Minnesota Family Investment Program - the state's welfare reform program for low-income families with children), is still getting the $530 per month.