Journey to Wellness

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(This episode of Journey to Wellness originally aired June 17, 2019.  Look for an updated list of links at the end of  this story.)

Canada has finished its three-year inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous woman and girls. And they're calling it genocide. Is that the right word?

 And why does Canada seem to be so much further along the road to acknowledging historical wrongs and trying to make reparation than the US?

Dr. Antony Stately

Last time, Dr Antony Stately joined us from Minneapolis to talk about the challenges of a COVID-19 pandemic in the midst of an underserved, vulnerable population.

As the CEO of the Native American Community Clinic, that's his job, made even more challenging by the riots that sprang up in the neighborhood after George Floyd's death May 25.

This week, he talks to us as a father, a member of the community, and a man who grew up in that neighborhood.

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College/Facebook

Most students, parents, and teachers aren't huge fans of distance learning, but for Indigenous students and tribal colleges, it's alot more than just a nuisance.

At 4pm on Friday, March 27th, just at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic and national shut-downs, the chairman of the of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe got a phone call from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

But instead of the offer of help he was expecting, he was told the Department of the Interior was taking their land out of trust.

Steve Premo/MNHS Press

Baabiitaw Boyd believes the elders who told her that a lot of the problems Native people experience are the result of not having access to their language and cultural practices.

MN Historical Society

Indigenous people in Minnesota - like Indigenous people in places all around the country - are rewriting the narrative these days.

They're telling their own stories. They are letting the world know that they're very much a part of contemporary life in this country. 

Wica Agli/Facebook

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell just wishes he'd gotten started ten years ago.

Mending the Sacred Hoop's training and resource director is celebrating 25 years with the organization, long enough to see societal thought about violence against women begin to shift in some significant directions.

National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

The boarding school era for Native American children in America began with the opening of the Carlisle School in 1879. It was considered a more "merciful" solution to what was then thought of as "the Indian problem." 

It continued until the passage of the Indian Child Welfare act in 1978, when Native parents finally gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.

©First Nations Development Institute

Living in a food desert is bad enough - that's defined as an area vapid of fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods, usually found in impoverished areas - but it's worse when you live 20 or 30 miles from the closest place that sells anything to eat at all.