Journey to Wellness in Indian Country

mcav0y/Flickr

Duluth's Dr. Mary Owen, an Alaska Native and the head of UMD's Center of American Indian and Minority Health, isn't encouraged by the news from her friends and relatives in Juneau these days.  

photo by MMIWG-FFADA

Canada has finished its three-year inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous woman and girls. And they're calling it genocide. Is that the right word?

Wica Agli/Facebook

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell just wishes he'd gotten started ten years ago.

Mending the Sacred Hoop's training and resource director is celebrating 25 years with the organization, long enough to see societal thought about violence against women begin to shift in some significant directions.

Thomas Hawk/Flickr

The National Indigenous Women's Resource Center keeps getting calls wondering how they're using the money they got from the distribution of the movie Wind River.

St. Louis County, MN

KUMD talks with Andrea Larson, a social worker with St. Louis County's Children and Family Services Indian Child Welfare Unit.  She has been recognized by the Minnesota Indian Child Welfare (ICWA) Advisory Council with its first ever Social Worker Award.  The ICWA Advisory Council created the award as a way to also acknowledge the good work that is happening in ICWA here in Minnesota. 

Missing KC-Kristopher Clarke/Facebook

Lissa Yellowbird-Chase knows first-hand about the violence and danger Native American women face.*

But she knows other things, too.  In Canada, a 2016 report found that indigenous women are five times more likely to be victims of homicide than non-indigenous women. But in the United States, says Yellowbird-Chase, there are 1-2% more missing and murdered indigenous men than women.

AICHO / Dabinoo 'Igan Domestic Violence Shelter

  [This episode of Journey to Wellness in Indian Country was originally aired on December 3, 2018, and was re-aired on December 31, 2018.] 

We speak with Shannon Larson, the Director of the Dabinoo 'Igan Domestic Violence Shelter (run by AICHO, the American Indian Community Housing Organization) about their move to a new, larger facility.

©AICHO Galleries

Photography gives people the chance to share the images and stories they see in their minds' eye with others.

So the upcoming exhibit, Through Our Eyes at AICHO Galleries at the end of this month not only gives a glimpse into the minds of Duluth's Native youth through their photographs and writings, it illuminates what in their culture is speaking to this next generation.

©AICHO

AICHO's purchase of the former 4th Street Market won't just restore food to a "food desert" in one of Duluth's poorest neighborhoods.

When it opens, perhaps next summer, it will provide four units of housing, an indigenous food market (perhaps the first in the state), a coffee shop, deli, gift shop and house a new coffee roasting business.

©Jonathan Thunder. Used with permission.

Duluth's indigenous community is gathering at City Hall on this rainy Monday to sing, celebrate a new eagle staff, and observe a moment of silence.

Colombus Day has been controversial for a long time now; many people see his "discovery of the New World" as the first step down a long road of devastation for the people who were already here.

But in Duluth, organizers are moving from "a day of mourning" to one of celebration - one that can make their children proud of their heritage.

©Kelly Hallman

Parents want to keep their children safe from anything that could harm them - including information.

Parents of Black sons report painful conversations with them about how society may treat them, but Kelly Hallman, the director of IMAGEN (Indigenous Adolescent Girls' Empowerment Network) says Native girls are already tuned into the dangers they see around them.

For years, the existing Thunderbird-Wren Halfway House and Treatment Center has been providing individualized treatment to those suffering from chemical dependency.  However, its facility on 4th Avenue West in Duluth is showing its age.

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