Migration

©Lisa Johnson

It's that time again.  If you're not distracted by raptors and Canada geese and nighthawks streaming overhead, maybe you'll pull your car over to the side of the road and take a stroll through the goldenrod, where you can find a wide variety of insects and bees ... and maybe even Larry Weber.

Answer:

Kilarov Zaneit/Unsplash

The start of school is coming.  It's unavoidable.

Summer is winding down.  It's unavoidable.

But these days, dubbed "the Sad Days" by a school-age Larry Weber, now bring countless delights.

Copyright John P. Richardson. Used with permission.

When Larry Weber announced two weeks ago that the Hawk Ridge Raptor Count was starting this past Saturday (August 15), you could almost hear the groan of "No - already?"

The fact is, birds - and visitors - have been amassing at Hawk Ridge for awhile now.

Ironically, the fact that people aren't flying seems to mean they're more interested in watching birds who are.  The normally unflappable counters and other staff are looking at the August attendance - already way up - and trying to figure out how that will play out in September, and how they can keep everyone safe.

Peter M. Dziuk/Minnesota Wildflowers

Much cooler weather seemed strange and remarkable this past week, but Larry Weber says, that's because temperatures dropped down to "normal" from nasty hot.

Jeremy Austin/Flickr

Take advantage of the breezy days; Larry Weber says the northwesterly winds this morning are doing a fine job of keeping the mosquitos and blackflies away.

There's also still time to catch the tail end of the first phase of wildflowers and the beginning of the second, plus frogs are calling, birds are nesting, turtles are laying eggs and you can't swing a dandelion without hitting a butterfly or dragonfly!

Garth Williams, original sketch for "Charlotte's Web," 1952

Aut-win proceeds apace, that time between the leaf drop and the first lasting snow cover.

Thanks to the end of Daylight Saving Time, we'll get a 25-hour day on Sunday.

What do you play to do with your extra hour? Watch the hawk migration continue at Hawk Ridge

Autumn Mott Rodeheaver/Unsplash

It's that time of October again when Mother Nature sends us some yard work, and since KUMD listeners were (appropriately) becoming members and watching it snow last weekend, the gorgeous few days to come will be just perfect for buttoning up the last of the yard work.

55Laney69/Flickr

So far, August is shaping up to be July ... at 50% intensity, or something.

It's been warmer than normal (but not as much as last month) and drier than normal (but not as much as last month).

"Awesome August," as Larry calls it, does have it's own unique charms, too: like it's own wildflowers, the earlier wildflowers going to seed, and an abundance of animals, birds and insects on the move.

Orthonit/Flickr

Larry Weber is enjoying all the ingredients of a Perfect Mosquito Morning plus he's got all our stats for July and a look forward into August.

Larry also reports a young barred owl at his place, calling for its parents.  You can listen to the barred owl's call here.

©Bryan French. Used with permission.

Maybe you can't leave right away to look for wildflowers with Larry Weber (or Bryan French, for that matter!), but here is a slideshow of many of the flowers Larry mentioned on his show today to tide you over.

Bryan French is a phenologist, photographer and the founder of the Duluth Phenology group on Facebook.

©John Krumm. Used with Permission.

Larry Weber has the stats as we say goodbye to October ... plus a look ahead to the changes we'll see in November, what's easy to see in his beloved season of aut-win, and some fabulous things to enjoy with the earlier-than-usual sunsets after Sunday.

* Remember to "fall backward," this weekend as we say goodbye to Daylight Saving Time, too.  And Larry recommends listening to an extra hour of KUMD.

©Lisa Johnson

Larry Weber says it's tamarack time!

©Lisa Johnson

The "gales of November came early" Wednesday.  Duluth's lakewalk became a casualty for the third time this year and the National Weather Service reports we've already had more precipitation by October 10 than we usually get in a whole month.

Still, Larry Weber says he wouldn't miss it for the world.

©Steve Kolbe. Used with permission

August, announced Larry Weber this morning, is one of his 12 favorite months.

He talked migration at Hawk Ridge, where the counters are hard at work, the fabulousness of spiders, how a mayfly hatch is a good indicator of clean water, and how come he's the guy driving so slowly and gawking at the goldenrod by the side of the road.

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