Native American

Rock the Native Vote 2020/Facebook

Louisa Posada knows voter suppression efforts are going on right here in Minnesota.

Moving ballot boxes and polling places.  She knows of an instance where flares were put into a box to incinerate all the votes inside.

But despite a long history of disenfranchisement, (Native Americans didn't become legal citizens until 1924 and weren't eligible to vote in every state until 1962), there is a growing pushback: to get organized, to move as one group, and to learn about political processes and elections. "It's like reading the owner's manual," says Posada.

The Osage shield on the Oklahoma state flag shows a Plains-style ceremonial pipe representing Native Americans, and an olive branch representing European Americans. The symbols are meant to demonstrate "a love of peace by a united people."

Steve Premo/MNHS Press

This program was originally aired March 9, 2020.

Arne Vainio

In the Spirit of Medicine features the essays of Dr. Arne Vainio, an enrolled member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe and a family practice doctor on the Fond Du Lac reservation in Cloquet.

This episode was originally aired May 28, 2018.

Association of American Indian Physicians/Facebook

©Lisa Johnson

Looking around, it's hard to know where to start.

Worries and fears about physical safety, economic safety - your kids, your parents, your job ...

When Tom and Elizabeth Peacock started Black Bears and Blueberries Publishing, one of their goals was to create Native children's books for all audiences, written and illustrated by Native writers and artists.

Dani Pieratos

Farming at the bottom of a mine, working with your family, "Bear Clan negotiations" and more ...

Harvest Nation is poised to become an indoor, aeroponic farm ready to serve (in its pilot program incarnation) about a hundred families on the Iron Range.

But eventually, the plan is to serve about six times that number.

When we have to take a deep dive into things we'd rather avoid, we call it a character-building experience.

Author and artist Tashia Hart knew her writing was lacking something.

So she made the decision to invite the character-building so she could finally build the characters she wanted to.

Gidjie and the Wolves will be published in March by Hart's (Not) Too Far Removed Press.

Novelist Dr Carter Meland will be on campus tomorrow afternoon giving a talk called "Finding Our Way with Native Literature."

He's a senior lecturer in American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota, and the author of a book called Stories for a Lost Child.

When you lose your language, you lose more than just words. You lose the words you use to hold weddings and funerals and welcome children. You use the words that shape and define your world view.

In his latest book, Dr. Anton Treuer talks about the revitalization of indigenous language and cultures and the success stories that are not only preserving language, they're making a huge difference for the people learning them.

Tim Mossholder/Unsplash

  Women are from Venus, men are from Mars. That’s true in personal interactions, but it’s also true when it comes to heart disease. 

MN Historical Society

Indigenous people in Minnesota - like Indigenous people in places all around the country - are rewriting the narrative these days.

They're telling their own stories. They are letting the world know that they're very much a part of contemporary life in this country. 

Artisan Tax Talk: Not many people are excited about doing their taxes, but when you combine "the artistic personality" with a fairly unstructured occupation, it can become, in the words of Annie Dugan, "daunting, confusing and surprisingly unfair."  Never fear: the Superior Artisans are here with tomorrow's Artisan Tax Talk, an evening with an artist-friendly tax expert to help answer all your questions.

Pages