Native American

Award winning writer Linda Hogan is a Chickasaw poet, novelist, and essayist. She has written extensively on the natural world, and indigenous perspectives on nature and knowing.

Blink O'fanaye/Flickr

What is democracy?  Are its underpinnings being eroded?  Is it being threatened?  What, if anything can we do about it?

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson's Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies is a book that was written first for Ojibwe speakers - not even those fluent in the language but, like her, who are learning.

And she had specific hopes for her Anishinabe readers as well: that it would affirm their experiences , provide comfort, and that they would feel better for having read it.

Lorie Shaull/Flickr

It turns out that the hardest part of talking about sexual violence is not broaching an uncomfortable topic: it's realizing it's so universal among the women you know it almost doesn't register anymore.

Hakan Nural/Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has been with us for almost a year. In that year businesses have closed and people have lost jobs. Wearing masks and keeping social distance have caused deep divisions among us. 

  There are scare stories and myths on social media and other places about the vaccines and many people believe these myths. Fear has always been a powerful tool and has long been used to cause division. Fear is being used now and it isn't always easy to know what to believe.

Rock the Native Vote 2020/Facebook

Louisa Posada knows voter suppression efforts are going on right here in Minnesota.

Moving ballot boxes and polling places.  She knows of an instance where flares were put into a box to incinerate all the votes inside.

But despite a long history of disenfranchisement, (Native Americans didn't become legal citizens until 1924 and weren't eligible to vote in every state until 1962), there is a growing pushback: to get organized, to move as one group, and to learn about political processes and elections. "It's like reading the owner's manual," says Posada.

The Osage shield on the Oklahoma state flag shows a Plains-style ceremonial pipe representing Native Americans, and an olive branch representing European Americans. The symbols are meant to demonstrate "a love of peace by a united people."

Steve Premo/MNHS Press

This program was originally aired March 9, 2020.

Arne Vainio

In the Spirit of Medicine features the essays of Dr. Arne Vainio, an enrolled member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe and a family practice doctor on the Fond Du Lac reservation in Cloquet.

This episode was originally aired May 28, 2018.

Association of American Indian Physicians/Facebook

©Lisa Johnson

Looking around, it's hard to know where to start.

Worries and fears about physical safety, economic safety - your kids, your parents, your job ...

When Tom and Elizabeth Peacock started Black Bears and Blueberries Publishing, one of their goals was to create Native children's books for all audiences, written and illustrated by Native writers and artists.

Dani Pieratos

Farming at the bottom of a mine, working with your family, "Bear Clan negotiations" and more ...

Harvest Nation is poised to become an indoor, aeroponic farm ready to serve (in its pilot program incarnation) about a hundred families on the Iron Range.

But eventually, the plan is to serve about six times that number.

When we have to take a deep dive into things we'd rather avoid, we call it a character-building experience.

Author and artist Tashia Hart knew her writing was lacking something.

So she made the decision to invite the character-building so she could finally build the characters she wanted to.

Gidjie and the Wolves will be published in March by Hart's (Not) Too Far Removed Press.

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