Neighbors

Duluth Police Department

Duluth Police Chief Mike Tusken joins us in a candid and wide-ranging conversation about policing in these challenging times: the people they want to hire - and don't want to hire these days; the outrage, sorrow and embarassment of fellow police after the death of George Floyd, and the toll the unavoidable backlash takes on officers.

Plus he talks about the social workers already embedded within the department, the importance of School Resource Officers, and how a police union can work - and not work - for a police department and the community.

Mika Baumeister/Unsplash

Flattening the curve of COVID-19 doesn't mean it's gone away.

That's one of several take-aways epidemiologist Dr. Catherine McCarty wants people to internalize.

Some others?

  • Wear a mask.  You wear it for other people; not yourself.
  • Make sure you distance physically, but not socially.  Stay connected with the people who matter to you.
  • Be kind.

BuzzFeed: 19 Tweets About People “Deciding” The Coronavirus Is Over (Even Though It’s Definitely Not)

Christopher Owusu/Unsplash

As one of those kids whose parents moved around a lot, Meg Litts got used to being "other."  The new kid. "You're not from here, are you?"

Then she purposely went to Grinnell College where only 10% of the students there were actually from Iowa.

Now she's using those insights and others gained from her life to unpack white fragility, systemic racism, and how to listen.

xiao zhou from Getty Images

Sometimes you just can't win.

As public health officials watched the COVID-19 pandemic play out on the east and west coasts, they encouraged us here in the Midwest to social distance and wear masks.

Sharon McCutcheon (l) and Joseph Ngabo (r)/Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic is turning out to be a lot more complicated than we thought.

How to stay safe and how to keep other people safe are complicated by issues of what safety really means: having a job? Being able to open your business?

University of Minnesota Duluth

Dr. Richard Buckalew of UMD is a mathematics professor at UMD, so unless you're pretty math-savvy yourself, things can veer off into the weeds pretty quickly.

But in addition to providing some infographics to help you better understand the math behind social distancing, he's got a lot of interesting things to say about the big differences small changes can make, and how to evaluate the news and claims crowding your social media feeds these days.

University of Minnesota Duluth

In one sense, John Bennett and the others at the University of Minnesota Extension's Center of Community Vitality are doing the same thing they've always done: gathering data, analyzing it, and providing it to the Northland in an easy-to-understand, accessible format.

Alexas_Fotos/Pixabay

Quarantining at home may be one of the most effective ways to stop the spread of COVID-19, but it also means more people are staying home - alone - with their abusers.

And it's no accident, either, that isolating the victim from their support system and other people is one of the first tools an abuser uses to control their partner.

  And when finally the bottom fell out
I became withdrawn
The only thing I knew how to do
Was to keep on keepin' on
Like a bird that flew
Tangled up in blue ......

The Duluth Dylan Fest was indeed blue back in March when they decided to cancel this year's celebration of the iconic singer-songwriter -- for about a minute.

Vin Crosbie/Flickr

We've come a long way from the days when Walter Cronkite, the anchorman of the CBS Evening News, was widely hailed as the "most trusted man in America."

Whether you blame the repeal of the Fairness Doctrine in 1987, the proliferation of the internet, or the shift from "journalists" to "content creators," separating truth from fiction - even as it pertains to those reporting or presenting "the news" has become impossibly complicated.

And at the same time, the most important work, that of local newspapers, radio and television, is disappearing bit by bit.

Locally Laid Egg Company and Sebastian Dumitru/Unsplash

Maybe you can't hoard eggs.  But they're - pardon the expression - flying off store shelves as more and more people are cooking and baking.

So even though they're busy selling all the eggs they can produce, Jason and Lucie Amundsen of Locally Laid Egg Company hit on another idea to help local folks interested in urban agriculture.

Anthony Crider/Flickr

An article in Forbes magazine this week was titled "Security Researchers Say The Reopen America Campaign Is Being Astroturfed."

It laid out in detail how cybersecurity researchers determined that, far from being spontaneous and organic (grassroots, if you will) the protests "can be linked to domains associated with gun advocacy groups, lobbyists, and other conservative organisations."

GoToVan/Flickr

People interpret the information about COVID-19 and/or the economy depending on how these things affect them.

  Is there any way to get close to an objective method to weigh these two competing interests?  How should we be thinking about this?  How should we be parsing the information we get about both issues?

Fusion Medical Animation/Unsplash

Last week's announcement by the World Health Organization that "there's no evidence shows that having coronavirus prevents a second infection" is a big deal, because almost all of our ideas of how "moving forward" looks are predicated on the assumption that people who have had the virus are "safe to resume normal life."

Mubariz Mehdizadeh/Unsplash

If you suffer from a mental illness like anxiety or depression, chances are you have several tools in your toolbox to help you cope and get back to a healthier state of mind.

But what if you've been fine your whole life - until now - and you're wondering why the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic are turning you into someone you don't recognize?

Pages