Ojibwe

@Jonathan Thunder. Used with permission.

There aren't a lot of people who write poetry in Ojibwe, and Michelle Goose has no desire to be one of them.

Michelle is on the Native American Studies faculty at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, and she teaches classes in Ojibwe, but she says she's never had any desire to try her hand at poetry in the language.

But she was pleased to find a work - in Ojibwe and English - by Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, (1800-1842), "...the first known American Indian literary writer, the first known Indian woman writer, the first known Indian poet, the first known poet to write poems in a Native American language, and the first known American Indian to write out traditional Indian stories (as opposed to transcribing and translating from someone else’s oral delivery, which she did also)."

Sam Zimmerman

Sam Zimmerman is taking a class to re-learn his language, Ojibwemowin.

He laughs his efforts are making his ancestors' ears bleed, but if Sam's ancestors have been keeping track of him, chances are they're pretty proud.

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson's Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies is a book that was written first for Ojibwe speakers - not even those fluent in the language but, like her, who are learning.

And she had specific hopes for her Anishinabe readers as well: that it would affirm their experiences , provide comfort, and that they would feel better for having read it.

While Indigenous children in Minnesota learn plenty of English language, most don't have a lot of chances to learn the languages of the people who were here first.

When Tom and Elizabeth Peacock started Black Bears and Blueberries Publishing, one of their goals was to create Native children's books for all audiences, written and illustrated by Native writers and artists.

Minnesota Historical Society

Fort Snelling needs a name change, says the Minnesota Historical Society. That is, the historic site, not the fort itself. 

When Thomas Peacock's publisher came to him asking for a new book, they said there were plenty of books about Lake Superior, trees, rocks ...

"What's left?," thought Peacock. 

Then he looked up.

The Forever Sky is published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press.

Marcia Anderson's fascinating, gorgeously illustrated book of the art of the Ojibwe bandolier bag had its genesis in a box she opened in 1981.

(This interview was originally aired August 31, 2017)

Carl Gawboy

Niiyo-wiij-anishinaabeg or four friends, a new show in The Depot Great Hall, has opened and is up through July 24.  Minnesota artists George Morrison, Joe Geshick and Carl Gawboy each took different artistic paths with their work but their journeys as leading Ojibwe artists in the 20th century brought them together. They welcome you on this journey with them, as the fourth friend.

©Ivy Vainio

Giishpin bi-izhaayan kiwenz ojibwemowin gabeshiwining gidaa-gashkitoon ji-agindaman o’o ikidowinan.

Lorin Robinson talks about this work of historical fiction, and the modern-day pitfalls of writing across cultural lines.

"The 13: Ashi-niswi" is published by Open Books.

Listen as Linda Legarde Grover introduces her new book, "Onigamiising Seasons of an Ojibwe Year" and talks about the significance. 

Onigamiising in Ojibwe translates to, "the place of the small portage," which refers to the strip of land separating the bay and harbor near Park Point. 

Linda had written small excerpts about seasons and met with editors to create this novel.

Gordon Coons 2002

Ojibwe Artist Gordon Coons continues with his Catalyst series at Intermedia Arts, Dimensions of Indigenous with Cultural Identity Politics.  Teamed up with Rebekah Crisanta de Ybarra of Xinka-Lenca, El Salvador, together their work has focused on indigenous identity, storytelling and the impact of colonizastion.  Through collaborative art and public events, they move the conversation forward in and out of the gallery setting.  You can see their current work,  up through February 4, 2017 at Intermedia Arts at 2822 Lyndale Ave S.

KUMD shared an concert on Thanksgiving with Native American musicians Sonny Johnson and Annie Humphrey in an evening of  Minnesota music and stories of shared traditions. The KUMD event Ojibwe Then & Now included a full day of events celebrating Ojibwe tradition and bringing it forward, from the youth of Remer schools performing at the traditional walleye feast  to this evening concert at Weber Music Hall. This event was supported by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund and by Native Lives Matter.

Singer/songwriter, artist, member of the Leech Lake Ojibwe, former marine, and mom; Annie Humphrey is all of these things. She joined us in the studio January 8, 2016. She had a CD release show the same night at the American Indian Community Housing Organization in Duluth, with a display of her art work. Annie performed for our Ojibwe Then and Now concert last year; find the audio under "Related Content" below.

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