Poetry

You might be hard-pressed to name famous Finnish philosophers; in fact, people in Finland might be hard-pressed to name famous Finnish philosophers.

But there is one philosopher – of a sort – that Finns are introduced to from the time that they’re born and they carry his wisdom with them throughout their lives – through his poetry.

Long before she worked at KUMD, our former station manager, Mimmu Salmela was born and raised in Finland.  And it didn’t take her any time at all to select a reading from this poet-philosopher – however unlikely he might seem to begin with.

When Northland Prism and the Duluth Poetry Chapter had the same idea and approached each other about a poetry event, they wanted to expand some of the ideas of love we're inundated with on Valentine's Day.

The brainstorming sessions that followed brimmed with love: of community, of environment, romantic love, platonic love, self-love. But it also overflowed into conversations about transitions, including those small moments when relationships change.

Duluth Poetry Chapter/Facebook

Last weekend's DriftWords event found poets ranging up and down the shore at Wisconsin Point: writing poems with sticks in the sand, with markers on driftwood and even with pebbles on the beach.

Next week, it’s a writing event with the theme of "bodily autonomy," loosely translated as "the choices you make with your body."

Joy Harjo/Facebook

Award-winning novelist and poet Linda LeGarde Grover shares her thoughts on the selection of Joy Harjo as the first Native American Poet Laureate. 

© 2018 New Rivers Press

Among the many events during this year's Duluth Dylan Fest, there was the poetry event on Wednesday night at Teatro Zuccone featuring poems from the anthology Visiting Bob: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Bob Dylan, edited by Thom Tammaro and Alan Davis and published in 2018 by New Rivers Press in Moorhead, Minnesota.  

John Royle on Unsplash

Poet Mary Oliver wasn't "from here," but so many of us feel drawn to the work of the woman the New York Times called the "poet of the natural world."

Mary Oliver died January 17.  All this week on Northland Morning, local poets will be sharing their favorite Mary Oliver poems

This morning Barton Sutter reads Mary Oliver's "Picking Blueberries, Austerlitz, New York,1957".

Andrew Johnson on Unsplash

Poet Mary Oliver wasn't "from here," but so many of us feel drawn to the work of the woman the New York Times called the "poet of the natural world."

Mary Oliver died January 17.  All this week on Northland Morning, local poets will be sharing their favorite Mary Oliver poems

This morning Deb Cooper reads Mary Oliver's "Roses, Late Summer."

Northland poet Barton Sutter joins us this morning to read from his newest work, and talk about poetry: "language," he says, "that would like to be music."  

Anishinabe author Heid Erdrich talks about how a social media post spurred her to create a collection of contemporary Native poetry by exciting new writers and to "bring our poetry out there where readers can find it."

Heid Erdrich's New Poets of Native Nations is published by Graywolf Press.

How can we die when we're already

Minnesota Historical Society

If the committee had seen Bob Dylan's high school poetry, would he still have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2016?

For better or worse, they didn't, but Dylan fans will be able to see some of the Dylan poetry canon (circa Hibbing High School, 1956) later this month at the Minnesota Historical Society.

Bardia Photography/Flickr

Duluth Poet Laureate Ellie Schoenfeld hosts the Readings from Seven Nations open mic event, featuring poetry from the seven nations blocked by excecutive order from travel or immigration to the US: Iran, Libya, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, and Syria.

Duluth's newly-minted poet laureate, Ellie Schoenfeld, reads from her work and talks poetry, pretension, community ... and the value of following an idea to see where it leads, without attaching to an outcome.

To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee,

One clover and a bee.

And revery.

The revery alone will do

if bees are few.

~ Emily Dickinson

For more information on the work of Dr. Marla Spivak and the University of Minnesota's Bee Lab and Bee Squad, click here.

Linda LeGarde Grover's new collection of poetry, The Sky Watched: Poems of Ojibwe Lives, is not a collection of "pretty poems."

They're there, of course, but more often the words are are a slap in the face, delivered with a muted ferocity that leaves the reader first shocked,  then speechless.  

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