Precipitation

©Lisa Johnson

For June to stay on track, precipitation-wise, we'd need to get about an inch of rain per week, and that's not counting the deficit we're carrying over from May.

The not-great news is that some vernal ponds are already evaporating due to the dryness.

The good news?  Fireflies and lady's-slippers!

Jeremy Austin/Flickr

Take advantage of the breezy days; Larry Weber says the northwesterly winds this morning are doing a fine job of keeping the mosquitos and blackflies away.

There's also still time to catch the tail end of the first phase of wildflowers and the beginning of the second, plus frogs are calling, birds are nesting, turtles are laying eggs and you can't swing a dandelion without hitting a butterfly or dragonfly!

Copyright JR Kelsey. Used with permission.

Mother Nature's in no hurry to balance out our too-dry conditions, although a little rain the other did day help.

And it sure gave "the greening" a goose as quaking aspens and smaller trees began to leaf out, and tamaracks sprouted new needles.

But serendipity plays a role when the trees' new leaves, the hatching of small caterpillars, and the warbler migration all occur at the same time, and Larry says, this might be the year.

JLS Photography Alaska/Flickr

©Lisa Johnson

Larry Weber did a little traveling around western Minnesota this last week and took in decidual forests, aspen parklands, and prairie country.

But despite seeing plenty of migrants and leaf color, he just couldn't find a public radio station he likes as much as KUMD.

Markus/Flickr

As we enter the last weekend of summer, Larry says despite it being warmer and drier than usual, we're actually above normal, precipitation-wise, for the entire year thanks to this past week.

Frances Gunn/Unsplash

Red sky at night, sailors' delight.
Red sky at morning, sailors take warning...

Larry found that old adage true when a red sunrise this week gave way to rain and thunderstorms ...

Meanwhile, September is stacking up sensationally with winged ants, pelecinid wasps, glow worms, leaf color and avian migrants.

And there's no telling what you'll see if you take his advice and stroll into a patch of goldenrod.  Look for bumblebees and perhaps, a bearded naturalist!

redpoll photo courtesy Laura Erickson

Venus is beautiful first thing in the morning these days; and the combination of light snow and warm temperatures mean lots of critters are out and about and leaving great tracks.

Larry's seen a couple of unusual animals out and about - a gray fox, and a chipmunk who was supposed to be sleeping - but he's still waiting patiently for redpolls to come to his feeder.

©Steve Kolbe. Used with permission

August, announced Larry Weber this morning, is one of his 12 favorite months.

He talked migration at Hawk Ridge, where the counters are hard at work, the fabulousness of spiders, how a mayfly hatch is a good indicator of clean water, and how come he's the guy driving so slowly and gawking at the goldenrod by the side of the road.

Stephanie Brown/Flickr

We've got daylight from 5:15am to 9:00pm this month, and from fireflies to songbirds to butterflies, dragon flies, frogs, wildflowers and trees, Mother Nature is taking advantage of every single second.