Public Affairs

Chris Harwood

St. Louis County Public Works and the City of Duluth will be holding a virtual public meeting to provide information about - and get feedback on - plans to construct a roundabout at the intersection of Glenwood Street and Snively Road.  KUMD talks with Vic Lund, a St. Louis County Traffic Engineer, about the considerations that were used by the city and county when determining a roundabout would be the best option at that intersection.

LISC Duluth and the US Bank Foundation recently joined to provide Main Street Lincoln Park businesses grants to implement their COVID-19 safe reopening and recovery plans.  Grants of $5,000 along with technical assistance provided by Main Street Lincoln Park and the Entrepreneur Fund were awarded to eight businesses from retail to the trades to a neighborhood farm.  Those businesses include Liila Boutique, Sew Duluth, New-2-You, Duluth Pottery, Sheet Metal Solutions, Flora North, Saltless Sea Urban Farm, and Hemlocks Leatherworks.

Keri Pickett/
Keri Pickett/PICKETT PICTURES LLC

In years past Honor the Earth was able to host an annual gala event at Bayfront Festival Park to raise grant funding for native organizations.  In May of this year, undaunted by the challenges of a pandemic, two of the Honor the Earth cofounders, Winona LaDuke, and Amy Ray and Emily Saliers of Indigo Girls, staged an online music event that raised $230,000 of grant money that will be awarded to 50 native organizations around the U.S.

Lake Superior Community Health/Facebook

Almost half of the people in Cloquet and Carlton County haven't had dental care in the last year.

A third of the people in those areas say they've put off a visit to the dentist because of the cost.

The memes about introverts and extroverts navigating quarantine and social distancing are funny - and sometimes, really resonate - but Dr. Mallory McCord warns that stereotyping people is a bad idea - and introverts - seriously - are frequently seen as not as valuable as their more extroverted counterparts.

Yoshiyasu Nishikawa/Flickr

(This episode originally aired March 31, 2020)

Maybe you want to use this time at home to learn a new skill.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to start healthier habits.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to figure out how to keep your family out of your hair.

Whatever your plan, Arlene Coco has a suggestion for that.

Amy Swanson/Steve O'Neil Apartments

Regardless of what school looks like this fall, kids at the Steve O'Neil Apartments in Duluth will be ready for it.

And so will their parents.

Jernej Furman/Flickr

Anyone who's ever watched a science fiction movie knows, when the mayor bursts into the lab and demands results right now because the Governor is on the line, something Bad is going to happen in the lab.

Luckily for us, despite the clamoring of the world for a COVID-19 vaccine, there are many layers of good science protecting us from something being rushed to market before it's been adequately tested.

Copyright Deb Holman. Used with permission.

There aren't a lot of benefits to being homeless, but Deb Holman says right now, folks are probably safer outside in tents than inside in a shelter.

The good news is that COVID-9 is not taking a toll on people without homes here in the Northland. Street outreach worker Deb Holman of CHUM and HDC says they're offering folks masks and hand sanitizer and taking temperatures as much as they can, and many of what's called "unsheltered homeless" are already staying away from other people.

Ivy Vainio/AICHO

AICHO's food boxes started out as a way to make sure the residents at the American Indian Community Housing Organization had enough to eat.

Stay-at-home orders beginning in March meant kids were at home and eating meals there instead of school.  It meant sometimes there were extra family members quarantining together. 

It seems that the whole world took note of George Floyd's death, but the story of his death - and the protests that followed all across this country - wasn't being presented to everyone the same way.

Dr. Ryuta Nakajima, a UMD Professor of Art and Design, noticed his Japanese friends back home had a radically different perception of what was happening and why, so he took to social media to set some things straight.

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