rain

Tricia Galvin/Unsplash

As of yesterday, we've gotten twice the normal amount of rainfall we usually get in July.

That 2.83" is almost the same amount of rain as we got in April, May and June.

As our 90° temps cool into the low 80s, it's the perfect time to celebrate the 84th anniversary of 1936's "heat week;" the coolest temperature recorded that week (these were recorded by the lake, by the way) was 95° and the 106° on July 13 is the hottest temperature ever recorded in Duluth.

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Remember that 21-inch snowstorm we got last Thanksgiving?

You know; the one that shut everything down and people had to work from home and school was closed and we were shut up with our families and couldn't get out ... wow.

Copyright JR Kelsey. Used with permission.

Mother Nature's in no hurry to balance out our too-dry conditions, although a little rain the other did day help.

And it sure gave "the greening" a goose as quaking aspens and smaller trees began to leaf out, and tamaracks sprouted new needles.

But serendipity plays a role when the trees' new leaves, the hatching of small caterpillars, and the warbler migration all occur at the same time, and Larry says, this might be the year.

Markus/Flickr

As we enter the last weekend of summer, Larry says despite it being warmer and drier than usual, we're actually above normal, precipitation-wise, for the entire year thanks to this past week.

Frances Gunn/Unsplash

Red sky at night, sailors' delight.
Red sky at morning, sailors take warning...

Larry found that old adage true when a red sunrise this week gave way to rain and thunderstorms ...

Meanwhile, September is stacking up sensationally with winged ants, pelecinid wasps, glow worms, leaf color and avian migrants.

And there's no telling what you'll see if you take his advice and stroll into a patch of goldenrod.  Look for bumblebees and perhaps, a bearded naturalist!

Terry Priest/Flickr

Summer officially arrived Thursday morning at 5:07am.

Here in the Northland, the sun came up at 5:14am.

Today, it came up at 5:15am.

Leave it to Larry Weber to point out the days are already starting to get longer.

Jerry and Pat Donaho/Flickr

Larry Weber is enjoying the sunshine. pronghorn antelope and baby bison of South Dakota ... while here in the Northland, we're reminded of why he calls it the rainy season, and what was going on back around solstice time in June of 2012.

It's a dark and stormy  ... lunch hour ... on this Friday of Grandma's Marathon weekend ... 

Water Resource Management and Policy Extension Educator for Minnesota Sea Grant, John Bilotta shares work and ideas to help manage storm water run off.  He shares how green infrastructure is not just adding green space, but is also about reducing non permeable surfaces like roofs, roads and alleyways. 

What can you do? Build a rain garden and listen to The Sea Grant Files on KUMD.

MN Sea Grant

Eclipse 2017/NASA

Larry Weber says the difference between viewing a total eclipse and a partial eclipse is - literally - the difference between night and day.

But if a trip to the totality isn't in your plans, there are lots of ways to enjoy the eclipse, stay safe and even a helpful list of places who might be able to set you up with good eclipse-viewing optics.

David/Flickr

Master gardener Tom Kasper on what our rainy day/sunny day/ rainy day pattern might be good for.

Guy Sander (used with permission)

Larry Weber says the 2 1/2 inches of rain at his place this week means things are greening almost visibly.

Fiddlehead ferns that were just poking their heads from the soil last week are knee-high now, and if you have the time and patience, you'll be rewarded with good views of warblers.

In addition, Larry says he heard a visitor he hasn't heard at his place in over 20 years.

Bird eggs hatching
Lisa Johnson

Fireflies are out, so are baby mammals, insects, and the things that eat insects.

And Larry Weber says July is the month of fledglings.

Larry Weber on our rainy season: two-thirds of all the precipitation we get comes between May and September ... and most of that comes in June.

Ian Griffiths/Flickr

Frogs are calling, red maples are flowering, painted turtles are crowding logs to bask in the (scarce) sun ... 

and it's raining and cold.  Again.

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