Safe Haven Shelter and Resource Center

Alexas_Fotos/Pixabay

Quarantining at home may be one of the most effective ways to stop the spread of COVID-19, but it also means more people are staying home - alone - with their abusers.

And it's no accident, either, that isolating the victim from their support system and other people is one of the first tools an abuser uses to control their partner.

Daniel Hoherd/Flickr

Tonight's (Wednesday, March 6) performance of Out of Our Minds at Zeitgeist is, quite literally, out of the minds of the domestic violence survivors you will see on the stage.

In their own words, 19 women share what they want you to know about their experience.

More information about Safe Haven's production of Out of Our Minds can be found here.

Two weeks before Christmas, 22 women and 25 children slept at Safe Haven Shelter.

Safe Haven's 39-bed shelter is overflowing, and as the largest direct service provider to domestic violence victims in the Twin Ports, runs at about 92% capacity all year long.

But beyond the toys and presents the community and Safe Haven are able to provide, what these families need more than anything is emotional support - "the greatest gift."

Jeffrey/Flickr

What would it take to make you leave your home with nowhere to go?  For many women and families, it would take nothing less than violence.

1695 people* were helped by Safe Haven Shelter and Resource Center last year, many fleeing domestic abuse.

This week, KUMD takes a look at who is experiencing homelessness in the Northland. Who are they? Why don't they have homes? What are their options?

In this installment of our "Finding Home" series, Sarah Breyer of Safe Haven talks about women and children and where they can go -- short- and long-term -- when home isn't safe.