The Simple Plate

North American Normande Association/Facebook

Dale Peacock of Red Hoof Farms thinks there's a good, sustainable, quality life to be made on the south shore of Lake Superior; for farmers and cattle.

Of course, when you raise beef cattle, the ethical questions get a little stickier.

But Dale is a person with a lot of interest in - and concern about - people's relationship to what some have called "the stepmothers of humanity."

  (This episode originally aired 11/12/19)

This week, we sat down with Jake Williams and Brigid Reina of Superior Greens, a microgreens company in Ashland, Wisconsin. Microgreens contain up to 40-times the nutritional value of their mature counterparts which makes for concentrated deliciousness. They can be spicy or they can be sweet and buttery, and every flavor in between. On eggs or on cupcakes, microgreens are a healthy and decadent food source. Jake and Brigid shared a recipe for a microgreen dish, check it out below.

      

François Médion

When François Médion was the urban farm manager for the Duluth Grill, he saw his role as that of a builder.

Not just in the sense that he had to rip up a parking lot and put in an orchard and a rain garden, but he wanted to build an awareness of the need for wild things and wild spaces.

Now, in his new role as master gardener at the Ojibwe School on the Fond du Lac Reservation, the former summer program has grown to be a full-time, year-round venture.

benketaro/Flickr

If more photographs of dandelions sauteeing in butter and other look-what-I-just-picked-out-of-the-woods meal options are starting to populate your social media feeds, there are some good reasons for that.

In addition to growing their own food, folks are getting more interested in finding/foraging their own food, too.

But you can't just wander around stuffing random vegetation in your mouth; how are you supposed to learn what's safe to eat and how to prepare it?

Eric Ament says that's the joy of the "plant walk": "everyone is teaching their own experience."

©Russ Sprague. Used with permission.

As the food supply chain experiences some breakage and as we're learning the fragility of some of these systems, some folks are looking at urban agriculture as a partial solution.

Doing something, even if you start small, to provide fresh food for your family is not only good for your physical and mental health, it's yummy, too.  Even if you don't have a Twinkie bush.

Emily Vikre

Take:

  • a woman's business-self (co-founder of Vikre Distillery)
  • her mom-self (distance learning with two little kids)
  • her self-self (nerd who loves learning for the sake of knowledge)

Confine at home for several weeks, with internet access.

Result: Homeschooling with Cocktails

Emily says:

Yoshiyasu Nishikawa/Flickr

Maybe you want to use this time at home to learn a new skill.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to start healthier habits.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to figure out how to keep your family out of your hair.

Whatever your plan, Arlene Coco has a suggestion for that.

(Arlene recommended Yummly and BigOven for meal suggestions, and scroll down for some recipes she provided to get you started!)

Fisher-Merritt Family

When Janaki Fisher-Merrit was a kid growing up on the farm, his idea of teenage rebellion was telling his parents how they should be doing things.  Now the co-owner of the Food Farm in Wrenshall is telling a whole new generation of farmers.

Dani Pieratos

Farming at the bottom of a mine, working with your family, "Bear Clan negotiations" and more ...

Harvest Nation is poised to become an indoor, aeroponic farm ready to serve (in its pilot program incarnation) about a hundred families on the Iron Range.

But eventually, the plan is to serve about six times that number.

Rainy City/Flickr

Where have all the flowers gone? sang Pete Seeger.

Girls have picked them, every one...

  Yes, but did you know they were eating them?

The Simple Plate Episode 7 - Randy Hanson, PhD

Feb 4, 2020
Randy Hanson
Randy Hanson

From Eco-Entrepreneurship to the climate crisis, Randy walks us through the history of farming in the Anthropocene and ultimately, how food brings us closer together. 

                        

Listen to our full interview with Randy Hanson

Part 1:

Part Two:

The Simple Plate: Duluth Coffee Company

Jan 7, 2020
DCC Logo
Duluth Coffee Company

"On this episode we meet with Sam Levar of Duluth Coffee Company. We dive into the dark roast vs light roast myth, the numerous processes that ultimately affect the flavor of your coffee, and why Lake Superior’s water makes for a such great cup. " 

Two young men in a radio studio talking to each other into microphones and wearing headphones
courtesy of The Bark at UMD

This week we talk with Adam Kemp of Uff-da Organics, a farm near Wrenshall that specializes in pick-your-own strawberries plus wholesale vegetables and herbs.

  

Today we're joined Shane Dickey of Superior Small Batch a vegan food producer located in the Twin Ports. 

Over the years, Shane has developed a recipe for flavor-packed, meat free, burgers and sausages, amongst other vegan foods. 

The Simple Plate: Cole Grotting of UMD's Land Lab

Nov 27, 2019
Young man in overalls standing next to a truck bed full of winter squash.
Photo by Cole Grotting

This week we're joined at the table by Cole Grotting of the UMD Land Lab where we discuss the importance of agricultural education and food miles.

The Simple Plate is supported by The Whole Foods Co-op of Duluth.

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