The Simple Plate

Dream of Wild Health/Facebook

How can one little plot of land be healing a body, a mind, and a spirit?  How can it lift those spirits, change an outlook, connect people to their history and culture and even bring traditional teachings and values alive?

Hope Flanagan knows.

Duluth Community Action/Facebook

It's not often you hear about a community project that really benefits people - but isn't scraping for cash.

A recent influx of state and local funding, plus monies from organizations like Hunger Solutions MN really put some gas in the tank of Community Action Duluth's efforts to get their Mobile Market up and running.

Now folks who don't live close to a grocery store or for whom home delivery is problematic can do their shopping at a "grocery store on wheels."

Baby Cakes Wild Rice Bakery/Savage Girls Salads

There are countless ways people have learned to cook with wild rice - in soups, salads, hotdishes, and so on. Other than using it as added ingredient in breads, however, not as many have tried baking with wild rice. KUMD's Chris Harwood speaks with mother and daughter Leah and Delilah Savage, co-owners of Baby Cakes Wild Rice Bakery and Savage Girls Salads.

Natasha Lancour. Used with permission.

Natasha Lancour has been on a long journey of healing ... and trying to figure out where she belongs.

She doesn't have all the answers, but she knows that family, community, wellness and nature are a big part of it, especially because, she says, "healing often eludes people of color."

The story of Royal Roots Garden is a story that starts with a woman with no interest in gardening, the big garden she discovered in the backyard of her new home, and a challenge to herself.  And that story is just beginning.

Duluth Does Vegan/Facebook

Face it; you've always been just a tiny bit afraid of vegans.

According to the popular trope, electing not to eat or wear anything that comes from animals means you terrorize your relatives with what you refuse to eat at every family dinner, and hector mercilessly those who don't believe as you do.

Bonnie Ambrosi wants you to know these are not those vegans.

University of Minnesota/Cooking for Wellness

The University of Minnesota has been offering cooking classes for staff and faculty for several years now, but the combination of the pandemic (and mastery of teaching online) and an increasingly diverse workforce got Robin Schrow thinking.

Brian Yazzie

Brian Yazzie didn't find himself in any of the texts in culinary school.

The Diné chef and food justice activist from the Navajo Nation in Arizona says he found no representation of indigenous foods in the classroom.

But when he did a little digging, he discovered that half of the ingredients in recipes all over the world - the world, mind you - are indigenous ingredients from the Americas.

The Lake Superior Harvest Festival was just another in the long line of anticipated - but cancelled - events this year.

But the Lake Superior Sustainable Farming Association, which hosts the event, hasn't been moping.

©Russ Sprague. Used with permission.

  This episode originally aired May 19, 2020.

As the food supply chain experiences some breakage and as we're learning the fragility of some of these systems, some folks are looking at urban agriculture as a partial solution.

Doing something, even if you start small, to provide fresh food for your family is not only good for your physical and mental health, it's yummy, too.  Even if you don't have a Twinkie bush.

Lisa Johnson

 (This episode was originally aired April 27, 2020)

In this episode, we meet Cindy Hale of Clover Valley Farms, accidental farmer, educator, and now producer, educator, and infrastructure coordinator for the Finland Food Chain.

It's hard not to think, in the midst of our pandemic-challenged lives, that this whole "how am I gonna get food" thing would be a lot simpler if we could just go back in time about 80 years.

Patra Wise

David Wise created a small business on land his family has been farming for generations, out near Sawyer, and he’s all about health.

A favorite saying of his grandmother provided their mission statement (Mino Mashkiki
in Ojibwe means "good medicine").

Farming techniques are designed to keep the soil,  water and the rest of the ecosystem healthy, and growing healthy foods in healthy ways are paramount.

“My grandmother taught me that good food is good medicine,” says David.

Emily Vikre

(this episode originally aired April 14, 2020)

Take:

  • a woman's business-self (co-founder of Vikre Distillery)
  • her mom-self (distance learning with two little kids)
  • her self-self (nerd who loves learning for the sake of knowledge)

Confine at home for several weeks, with internet access.

Result: Homeschooling with Cocktails

Emily says:

Yoshiyasu Nishikawa/Flickr

(This episode originally aired March 31, 2020)

Maybe you want to use this time at home to learn a new skill.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to start healthier habits.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to figure out how to keep your family out of your hair.

Whatever your plan, Arlene Coco has a suggestion for that.

Ivy Vainio/AICHO

AICHO's food boxes started out as a way to make sure the residents at the American Indian Community Housing Organization had enough to eat.

Stay-at-home orders beginning in March meant kids were at home and eating meals there instead of school.  It meant sometimes there were extra family members quarantining together. 

North American Normande Association/Facebook

Dale Peacock of Red Hoof Farms thinks there's a good, sustainable, quality life to be made on the south shore of Lake Superior; for farmers and cattle.

Of course, when you raise beef cattle, the ethical questions get a little stickier.

But Dale is a person with a lot of interest in - and concern about - people's relationship to what some have called "the stepmothers of humanity."

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