snow

National Weather Service Duluth

The birds returned to the feeders this week, the green to the aspens and willows, and the spring ephemerals to the forest floor.

Oh yeah, and it snowed, too.

Callum Wale on Unsplash

Our first-half-of-the-month-bears-no-resemblance-to-the-second-half-of-the-month pattern continues, with March setting a record of -19 at the onset and ending up with an average temperature in the 30s.

Will April be any less erratic?

Probably not.

In 2013, we had 51" (that's fifty-one INCHES) of snow in April; in 2010, we had NO snow in April, and in 1952, the National Weather Service says we hit a record high of 88 degrees April 27th.

We Walk in Duluth/Facebook

At first blush, it's pretty easy to imagine what a group called We Walk in Duluth talked about at their advocacy and social hour this week.

Larry Weber's feeling a little blue that the lack of snowfall (plus the icy crust on the snow we do have) means crummy conditions for animal tracks.  He's still enjoying the regular seven birds who visit his feeders (plus, in Larry's case, the flock of wild turkeys), though (see photos above.)

Lisa Johnson

The earth is as close to the sun as it gets today -- and after the latest sunrise of the year (7:54am) , the sun will come out - tomorrow - a little bit earlier.

Plus a wrap-up of December stats, the Christmas Bird Count and a trio of planets to enjoy in the southern sky.

Christopher Harwood

Before yesterday it was looking to be one of the driest Decembers on record. However, yesterday's snowfall set a Northland record for that date.  Larry Weber talks about the snowfall, what will happen to it when it turns cold in the next 24 hours, and what the snow means for area wildlife, such as ruffed grouse, snowshoe hares, and tiny rodents.  The trees are particularly spectacular today.

Venus, Jupiter and Mercury are very closely aligned right now in the pre-dawn sky.  And on perihelion is coming up January 2, 2019, when the earth is closest to the sun in its annual orbit.

redpoll photo courtesy Laura Erickson

Venus is beautiful first thing in the morning these days; and the combination of light snow and warm temperatures mean lots of critters are out and about and leaving great tracks.

Larry's seen a couple of unusual animals out and about - a gray fox, and a chipmunk who was supposed to be sleeping - but he's still waiting patiently for redpolls to come to his feeder.

Lisa Johnson

Every year, seasoned Northland drivers crack wise about everybody re-learning how to drive after the first snowfall.

But even if you've been driving in snow your whole life, Duluth's hills make it a completely different proposition.

And what if you're new in town - a college student or a transplant from somewhere it NEVER snows?

The UMD Police have some friendly tips.

©Lisa Johnson

The "gales of November came early" Wednesday.  Duluth's lakewalk became a casualty for the third time this year and the National Weather Service reports we've already had more precipitation by October 10 than we usually get in a whole month.

Still, Larry Weber says he wouldn't miss it for the world.

©Tone Coughlin Photography. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

The first half of April ended in a most dramatic fashion: record-breaking (low) temperatures, high winds, crashing waves and a record snowfall.

And while it certainly wasn't appreciated by everyone, Larry Weber says it was still fascinating.

Northlanders rejoiced when we hit an official high temperature of 47 degrees Wednesday.

Trouble is, that's supposed to be the average temperature for this time of year.

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The snow is on the crocuses and dandelions.

The single-digit overnight lows tonight could crisp some early leaves.

But leave it to 20-year KUMD veteran host Tom Kasper to find some things for gardeners to look forward to.

Torn between longing for signs of spring and the excitement of a winter snowstorm, Northlanders can find a little something to make everyone happy.

Larry Weber returns from his peregrinations with a look into the future at The Spring To Come ... and marvels at February: it's only the second time in 40 years that it's been the snowiest month!

Paul Downey/Flickr

Larry Weber says, until now, only once in his forty years of keeping records has there been more snow in February than January.

After this weekend ... make that twice.

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