spring wildflowers

Jeremy Austin/Flickr

Take advantage of the breezy days; Larry Weber says the northwesterly winds this morning are doing a fine job of keeping the mosquitos and blackflies away.

There's also still time to catch the tail end of the first phase of wildflowers and the beginning of the second, plus frogs are calling, birds are nesting, turtles are laying eggs and you can't swing a dandelion without hitting a butterfly or dragonfly!

Copyright JR Kelsey. Used with permission.

Mother Nature's in no hurry to balance out our too-dry conditions, although a little rain the other did day help.

And it sure gave "the greening" a goose as quaking aspens and smaller trees began to leaf out, and tamaracks sprouted new needles.

But serendipity plays a role when the trees' new leaves, the hatching of small caterpillars, and the warbler migration all occur at the same time, and Larry says, this might be the year.

©John P. Richardson. Used with permission.

Tra la, it's May, the lusty month of May
That lovely month when everyone goes blissfully astray

Tra la, it's here, that shocking time of year
When tons of wicked little thoughts merrily appear

It's mad, it's gay, a libelous display
Those dreary vows that everyone takes
Everyone breaks
Everyone makes divine mistakes
The lusty month of May!

~ Frederick Loewe & Alan Jay Lerner, "Camelot"

Seabamirium [via Flickr]

Larry Weber is an educator, author and naturalist and he joins us every Friday for Backyard Almanac.

green heron: Tommy P. World/Flickr, sora: Becky Matsubara/Flickr, bittern: cuatrok77/Flickr

Who woulda thunk, in the midst of the April 15 blizzard, that a month later we'd hit a record-breaking 88 degrees?

In fact, who woulda thunk on Wednesday that we'd plummet from 88 to 52 by Thursday?

Yup.  It's May in the Northland.

This week's warmup has spring things bustin' out all over, from frogs calling to dragonfly and spider web sightings, to new migrants, spring wildflowers and white pelicans hanging out on the St. Louis River before they head north.

Teresa Boardman/Flickr

Tra-la!  It's May!  And Larry Weber reports the spring ephemerals are in full bloom and Jay Cooke State Park is the place to see them.