Trees

Pat Castellano. Used with permission.

The Icelandic Forest Service is encouraging people to hug trees.

An April 10 article from Iceland Review says:

Szilvia Basso/Unsplash

It feels like the world has gone pear-shaped overnight.

Even so, Larry Weber reminds us that "Mother Nature is still responding with spring."

And maybe, if you're being forced to out of the fast lane for a bit, this is just the opportunity to spend a little time in your own backyard, welcoming spring.

These young photographers may be lecturing you about "the good old days of film" before long.  The Duluth Art Institute's public darkroom will be getting a workout when the Youth Film Photography Club gets snappy Wednesday at 5:30pm

©David Cowardin/Blue Forest Films. Used with permission.

Brook trout like cool water.

Trees that overhang their rivers and streams provide shade and cool the water.  Without them, the water can get warm enough to harm or even kill the fish.

So "river maintenance" for groups like Gitche Gumee Trout Unlimited is more than just cleaning up litter; it means replanting native trees on riverbanks where they might have been cut back decades ago.

Peter Stevens/Flickr

Piles of dispirited, dirty snow.  Sand and grit on roads and sidewalks.  Flotsam beached by the receeding snowpack.

But Larry Weber, like his beloved redpolls, has returned to the Northland like a harbinger of Spring, and he has a lot more cheerful signs of the season for us to look for.

If you need a bettter view of the birdfeeders, Tom Kasper says now is a fine time to do a little "structural pruning."

But speaking of wild things and feeding them, now is also a great time to wrap trees, bushes and plantings to keep them safe from rabbits and deer.

Lisa Johnson

Raking is hard on your lawn when it - and the blanket of leaves - is as wet as it is.

Luckily, there are other things you can do, like planting spring bulbs and protecting your young trees from the onslaught of deer, rabbits and sun scald.

©John Heino. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

They're responsible for millions of dollars in tourism revenue across the country, and feature prominently in the portfolios of photographers, artists and anybody with a smart phone.

But those fall colors: the gorgeous reds (anthocyanins) and shimmering yellow and oranges (carotenoids) are really a kind of tree sunscreen.

Seriously.

Tom Kasper/Facebook

Cool air temps, warm soil temps: it's the best time to plant/relocate/divide/share perennials ... but Tom Kasper reveals a deteriorating relationship with his garden as the season moves on.

Vector.Junky.com

Master gardener Tom Kasper reminds us spring's not the only time to plant, and if your annuals are beginning to get tired, dead-headin' may solve the problem.

Less than a month ago, there was still ice and snow on the ground.

Which means, despite a weekend forecast of mid to upper 80s, the season for spring ephemerals is a little more ephemeral than usual.

Larry Weber with a wrap up of April stats (three times as much snow, but precipitation still below normal), the migrants who've shown up just in the last week, and happy news on the frog front.

Terry Kearney/Flickr

Storms, insects and street improvements have taken a toll on Duluth trees in recent years, and it turns out Duluthians take the loss of trees pretty seriously.

So tonight, a panel assembled by the McCabe Chapter of the Izaak Walton League and the League of Women Voters will be asking a lot of questions and encouraging the public to do the same.

Timothy Crawshaw/Flickr

The League of Women Voters wants to get folks excited about Arbor Day again, so they're throwing a free public event May 20, featuring guest speaker Louise Levy.

The Lorax is rumored to be making an appearance also.

Author Nora Murphy had a lot of questions about the land her family settled when they came to America, fleeing the potato famine in Ireland.

In a series of essays dedicated to trees in Minnesota, Murphy walks the line, as Heid Erdrich put it, between writing "what she has learned of people, not about them."

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