Where's Art

Kari Halker-Saathoff/Duluth Art Institute

The Duluth Art Institute has reopened and they have some exhibits up.  Folks who come into the Depot are, of course, asked to wear masks and social-distance.

Kari Halker-Saathoff: Odysseus & Penelope: The Long Journey

Downtown Duluth Arts Walk/Facebook

Springboard for the Arts is an organization that connects artists with resources to make a living, but they're not forgetting the rest of us.

A recent mailer features this invitation:

Blackbird Revolt

"Après" zine from Blackbird Revolt:

APRÈS is a zine we created to honor Elias Clayton, Elmer Jackson, and Isaac McGhie.  However, as we were crafting the zine, the police murdered George Floyd. We were devastated. This murder followed the murders of Ahmaud and Breonna. We were overwhelmed and trying to figure out how to act while processing the pain and constant struggle of being Black in this environment.

Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona/Unsplash

There are a couple interesting online events today:

Make it Matter: Actions for Advancing Equity

Monday, 15 June 202012:00 PM-12:55 PMFacing the Truth About Racial Disparities Wednesday, 17 June 202012:00 PM-12:55 PMOwning Your Cultural Integrity Friday, 19 June 202012:00 PM-12:55 PMTaking Action to Destroy Disparities

Eli Brody/Flickr

Museums were already in a time of transition before the coronavirus pandemic shut them down and death of George Floyd brought racism and other "colonial" attitudes - like "cultural looting" - to the forefront of the public consciousness.  How to move forward; how to listen and reevaluate is the challenge now. (Major U.S. Museums Criticized for Responses to Ongoing George Floyd Protests)

shirien.creates/Instagram

This week, Annie Dugan brings us stories about how public art is how we cope with - and grieve - the death of George Floyd.

Who knew there was such a thing as the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture - but that they're not "the government"?

Young person wearing a face mask with artwork of animal fangs
American Indian Community Housing Organization/Facebook

Perhaps the reality of how much and how fast the world has changed didn't really start to sink in until you tried to figure out to have an online playdate for your toddler. Or how to explain to your (perhaps) startled child why everyone was walking around in masks.

Duluth has launched a project to get kids designing masks and talking about why people are wearing them. You can find more information about the program - and a template - here.

KÖNIG GALERIE

While some artists and galleries are trying to adapt their work to an online platform, others are actually designed for it.  For instance, this exhibit, SURPRISINGLY THIS RATHER WORKS, the first in the König Galerie's virtual space, König Digital. (Oh, and you access the exhibition through an app!)

Duluth Art Institute

The Duluth Art Institute is announcing Response. a spring 2020 online exhibition presenting work - completed or in progress - that's a response to our current situation.

The DAI is also looking toward the future with optimism and inviting artists to submit proposals for the 2021 exhibition season.  More information about the application and proposal process is here.

Great Lakes Aquarium

The Great Lakes Aquarium needs to feed - and entertain - their animals during this time and art is playing a major role.  Animals might not be singing for their supper, but they are painting for it. And Aquarium educator Emma Pardini is creating a Quarantine Animal a day.

Annie says:

So much to enjoy on-screens and off this week:

Chris Monroe's Chico Bon Bon Netflix series drops May 8...    

Enjoy the Homegrown Virtual Edition courtesy of Joe Klander, a local artist whose daily drawings are a source of delight....

Copyright Gina Temple-Rhodes. Used with permission.

(left) “St. Matthew and the Angel” by Guido Reni, 1635 (right) Will Rhodes and his daughter, KiraCredit Copyright Gina Temple-Rhodes. Used with permission.Edit | Remove

Cabin-fevered brains are cooking up art recreations with stuff they find around the house (like pets and spouses and stuff).

Lend a Paw/Facebook

UMD Design students give folks a chance to see how virtual galleries work and look at the internet's favorite commodity: cute pets.

Annie Dugan is thinking a couple of thoughts she's pretty sure other people share:

1) I wonder if it will be easier to make the case for the importance of the arts and arts funding when this is over?

2) Grade-school teachers absolutely deserve three months off.

British Museum collection online

Annie Dugan's not the first teacher who's thrown out the syllabus as classes moved online.

But when she assigned her students this "mega master list" website* and asked them to find "art that quiets the mind," she didn't know how much she was going to need their results.

Incidentally, Annie writes:

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