World War II

Folks have been thinkng a lot about the second World War these days, remembering how the country came together with a common goal during a frightening period in its history.

Then, women had to step into unfamiliar roles and do it all: work, earn money, care for homes and family -- but when the war was over, there seemed to be a concerted effort to get women out of those jobs and careers.

National Archives

This week: honor, service, and keeping a promise.

 

 

In the Spirit of Medicine features the essays of Dr. Arne Vainio, an enrolled member of the Mille Lacs  Band of Ojibwe and a family practice doctor on the Fond Du Lac reservation in Cloquet.

Don O'Brien [via Flickr]

On this episode of Ojibwe Stories: Gaganoonididaa we talk with Richard Smith, an elder of the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, who talks about his experiences serving in the United States Navy in World War II, and his service in the U.S. Army following that. 

Ingebourg Schwingel

Tune in Monday for a Memorial Day Special at 7pm Mine Enemy: The Story of German POWs in America. During World War II, some 400,000 captured German soldiers were shipped across the Atlantic to prison camps dotted across the U.S. Suddenly the enemy was hoeing the back garden, and sometimes, sitting at the kitchen table. Hear both sides of the story from veterans who lived this most unusual moment in history. 

Monday May 29

6:00 Making Contact

6:30 Counterspin

7:00 Mine Enemy: The Story of German POWs in America