Coronavirus

KUMD is sharing locally-focused information during this COVID-19 crisis. Listen to our stories from Northland Morning and to our new Tuesday and Thursday 10am call-in show that shares updates and lets us connect as a community.

Yoshiyasu Nishikawa/Flickr

(This episode originally aired March 31, 2020)

Maybe you want to use this time at home to learn a new skill.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to start healthier habits.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to figure out how to keep your family out of your hair.

Whatever your plan, Arlene Coco has a suggestion for that.

Jernej Furman/Flickr

Anyone who's ever watched a science fiction movie knows, when the mayor bursts into the lab and demands results right now because the Governor is on the line, something Bad is going to happen in the lab.

Luckily for us, despite the clamoring of the world for a COVID-19 vaccine, there are many layers of good science protecting us from something being rushed to market before it's been adequately tested.

Nick van Wagenberg/United Nations Global Call Out To Creatives

St. Louis County's announcement Tuesday that 15 new cases of COVID-19 have been reported was surprising for a lot of reasons.

For one thing, it was one of the first times the new cases weren't connected to an outbreak in a congregate living facility, like longterm care.

For another, nine of the 15 cases involved people under 30.

Now begins the work of "contact tracing."  It's too early to have exact information but it seems that travel out of Minnesota may have played a part.

Mika Baumeister/Unsplash

Flattening the curve of COVID-19 doesn't mean it's gone away.

That's one of several take-aways epidemiologist Dr. Catherine McCarty wants people to internalize.

Some others?

  • Wear a mask.  You wear it for other people; not yourself.
  • Make sure you distance physically, but not socially.  Stay connected with the people who matter to you.
  • Be kind.

BuzzFeed: 19 Tweets About People “Deciding” The Coronavirus Is Over (Even Though It’s Definitely Not)

Native American Community Clinic

Around the middle of May, an article came out in Indian Country Today warning that, even though Native Americans in Minnesota have largely escaped the brunt of the COVID-19 pandemic, a quote - dire forecast for June  has housing, health care and homelessness advocates bracing for the worst - unquote.

xiao zhou from Getty Images

Sometimes you just can't win.

As public health officials watched the COVID-19 pandemic play out on the east and west coasts, they encouraged us here in the Midwest to social distance and wear masks.

Eli Brody/Flickr

Museums were already in a time of transition before the coronavirus pandemic shut them down and death of George Floyd brought racism and other "colonial" attitudes - like "cultural looting" - to the forefront of the public consciousness.  How to move forward; how to listen and reevaluate is the challenge now. (Major U.S. Museums Criticized for Responses to Ongoing George Floyd Protests)

Sharon McCutcheon (l) and Joseph Ngabo (r)/Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic is turning out to be a lot more complicated than we thought.

How to stay safe and how to keep other people safe are complicated by issues of what safety really means: having a job? Being able to open your business?

University of Minnesota Duluth

Dr. Richard Buckalew of UMD is a mathematics professor at UMD, so unless you're pretty math-savvy yourself, things can veer off into the weeds pretty quickly.

But in addition to providing some infographics to help you better understand the math behind social distancing, he's got a lot of interesting things to say about the big differences small changes can make, and how to evaluate the news and claims crowding your social media feeds these days.

©Lisa Johnson

Looking around, it's hard to know where to start.

Worries and fears about physical safety, economic safety - your kids, your parents, your job ...

Locally Laid Egg Company and Sebastian Dumitru/Unsplash

Maybe you can't hoard eggs.  But they're - pardon the expression - flying off store shelves as more and more people are cooking and baking.

So even though they're busy selling all the eggs they can produce, Jason and Lucie Amundsen of Locally Laid Egg Company hit on another idea to help local folks interested in urban agriculture.

Duluth Art Institute

The Duluth Art Institute is announcing Response. a spring 2020 online exhibition presenting work - completed or in progress - that's a response to our current situation.

The DAI is also looking toward the future with optimism and inviting artists to submit proposals for the 2021 exhibition season.  More information about the application and proposal process is here.

Zoongide’iwin is the Ojibwe word for courage and this is one of our grandfather teachings. Zoongide’iwin means to do what is right when the consequences are unpleasant, to do what is right even when you’re afraid.

This is the time for courage. This is the time to stay strong. The virus is depending on you to bring it to others and we cannot let that happen if we can help it.

©Lisa Johnson

The news that a pair of cats in New York came down with with COVID-19 and a pug in North Carolina did, too, has animal-lovers worried for the safety of our dogs and cats.

The bad news: if they're going to get it, chances are, they will get it from us.

The good news: they're probably not going to get it.

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