Coronavirus

KUMD is sharing locally-focused information during this COVID-19 crisis. Listen to our stories from Northland Morning and to our new Tuesday and Thursday 10am call-in show that shares updates and lets us connect as a community.

Most of the time, we don't talk about books that haven't been published yet on MN Reads, much less books that haven't even been written.

But when Tom Hanson, Ecolibrium 3 and the rest of the Lincoln Park neighborhood gets an idea for something great - there's no stopping them.

You can find out more about the OMC Smokehouse Cookbook and the Lift Lincoln Park project here.

 

David Lezcano/Unsplash

Normal reactions to abnormal circumstances. Prodding for an "aha moment." Navigating the "supposed tos."  The "human being vs. human doing" conundrum.

We'll take a look at what might be frazzling you these days when we're joined by Dr. Andrew John, a professor in the Doctor in Counseling Psychology program at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Max McGruder/Bent Paddle Brewing. Used with permission.

When Cindy Hale and Jeff Hall saw the income from their small farm drop "from several thousand dollars a month to zero, overnight," they realized the fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic wasn't going to be over anytime soon.

CSSE/Johns Hopkins University

Stay home. Stay home, stay home, stay home.

Dr. Catherine McCarty says she can't say it often enough, and she repeated the message again this morning.

The University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus epidemiologist talked about what we've learned about the coronavirus so far (enough to start work on a vaccine), the projected death toll (100,000 only in the "best case scenario") and what lessons we've already learned to carry into the future: "We should never have gone to work sick."

Dana DeVolk/Unsplash

On the one hand, folks are supposed to stay home.

But on the other hand, they are allowed to shop for food.

And since food supplier Sysco Minnesota had some perishable stuff sitting around (about a ton and a half, to be precise), they offered it to the community.  Now Bent Paddle Brewing Company, Clyde Iron Works, Pier B Resort Hotel and the 2020 Census are putting on a Free Farmer's Market this afternoon.

Plus how one kid is spending his break (so far) enjoying "chemistry" with his family.

KaLisa Veer/Unsplash

Whether it's bird watching, phenology or planning a garden, the backyard is the place to be these days.

As soon as things dry out a little more, Tom Kasper says we can get started on raking the gravel off the lawn, pruning animal-damaged trees and shrubs, and sussing out the perfect spot for your new vegetable garden.

Yoshiyasu Nishikawa/Flickr

Maybe you want to use this time at home to learn a new skill.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to start healthier habits.

Maybe you want to use this time at home to figure out how to keep your family out of your hair.

Whatever your plan, Arlene Coco has a suggestion for that.

(Arlene recommended Yummly and BigOven for meal suggestions, and scroll down for some recipes she provided to get you started!)

romanlily/Flickr

Minnesota Governor Tim Walz's "stay-at-home" order is is designed to slow the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic and buy as much time as possible for the state's health care system to prepare it.

Minnesotans are being asked to maximize "social distance," wash their hands frequently, avoid all contact with others if they're sick, and take particular precautions to protect folks with compromised immune systems.

In other words, pretty much everything it's impossible to do when you're homeless ... or working with people who are.

Noah/Unsplash

Cook County businessman Mike Larson talks about making the tough decision last week to shut down his vacation-rental business. 

And Cook County has joined a number of rural, vacationland counties in the region asking vacationers, second-home owners and those fleeing coronavirus to stay home - for now.

John Krumm, all rights reserved. Used with permission.

Lummi Communications/Facebook

Native people in America are facing the same situation the rest of the country finds itself in - but with a few significant differences.

Testing supplies and personal protection equipment are in short supply, as they are everywhere else, but among Native people, there is a disproportionate level of infectious disease, with 1 to 3 times the mortality of the overall population.

There is a higher level of lung disease and diabetes, many Native communities lack safe water  and a quarter of the people are uninsured.

Look Out for the Helpers/Facebook

We're bringing back the golden days of radio, updated for our new circumstances!

 This morning we debuted Neighbors, a combination interview/call in program to help keep us connected in these uncertain times.

 "Look Out for the Helpers" is a local group doing just that: looking out for the helpers.  In this case, that means raising money to provide local healthcare workers with coffee, bakery items and meals.

KUMD is Here for You

Mar 23, 2020

At this challenging time, live, local radio is more important than ever, and KUMD remains dedicated to sharing music, company, and information with our region at 103.3fm and online here at kumd.org. Tune in for community voices you trust, and for music that provides a welcome respite when you need it.

antefixus21/Flickr

Things were always pretty busy at AICHO.

The American Indian Community Housing Organization's Dabinoo'Igan Emergency Domestic Violence Shelter provides ten beds and is open 24/7, and Executive Director Michelle LeBeau says every day, they have to turn people away for lack of space.

The Permanent Supportive Housing program has 32 adults and 42 kids.

But all those adults and kids are staying put now, which means AICHO has more people consuming meals and other resources.

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