Coronavirus

KUMD is sharing locally-focused information during this COVID-19 crisis. Listen to our stories from Northland Morning and to our new Tuesday and Thursday 10am call-in show that shares updates and lets us connect as a community.

Zoongide’iwin is the Ojibwe word for courage and this is one of our grandfather teachings. Zoongide’iwin means to do what is right when the consequences are unpleasant, to do what is right even when you’re afraid.

This is the time for courage. This is the time to stay strong. The virus is depending on you to bring it to others and we cannot let that happen if we can help it.

©Lisa Johnson

The news that a pair of cats in New York came down with with COVID-19 and a pug in North Carolina did, too, has animal-lovers worried for the safety of our dogs and cats.

The bad news: if they're going to get it, chances are, they will get it from us.

The good news: they're probably not going to get it.

GoToVan/Flickr

People interpret the information about COVID-19 and/or the economy depending on how these things affect them.

  Is there any way to get close to an objective method to weigh these two competing interests?  How should we be thinking about this?  How should we be parsing the information we get about both issues?

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College/Facebook

Most students, parents, and teachers aren't huge fans of distance learning, but for Indigenous students and tribal colleges, it's alot more than just a nuisance.

Tamas Tuzes-Katai/Unsplash

Dr. Glenn Simmons Jr. has an analogy about the COVID-19 pandemic and organ donation.

But it's not the stretch it might seem.

There are laws against selling your own organs, he explains, because the people most likely to do so are already the people with the fewest resources.

Minnesota's Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan said last week, “I think we’ve heard some say that COVID-19 is the great equalizer, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. What this crisis has done is lay bare the inequities that already existed within our state.”

Fusion Medical Animation/Unsplash

Last week's announcement by the World Health Organization that "there's no evidence shows that having coronavirus prevents a second infection" is a big deal, because almost all of our ideas of how "moving forward" looks are predicated on the assumption that people who have had the virus are "safe to resume normal life."

Dayne Topkin/Unsplash

The good news is that a second round of PPP (Paycheck Protection Program) funding for small businesses opened Monday.

The bad news is that some of the same problems - like an overloaded system - are still being experienced.

Some more good news is that St. Louis County announced this morning it's been allocated over $2 million dollars in special allocations from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and if there's a little bad news mixed in, like uncertainty about how the money needs to be spent ... well, let's just focus on the good news for a little.

Mubariz Mehdizadeh/Unsplash

If you suffer from a mental illness like anxiety or depression, chances are you have several tools in your toolbox to help you cope and get back to a healthier state of mind.

But what if you've been fine your whole life - until now - and you're wondering why the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic are turning you into someone you don't recognize?

Arne Vainio

  “A great sickness has been visited upon us as human beings. This happened to us as Native people a long time ago and it devastated us and killed us by the millions. It took our elders and our babies alike and there was nothing we could do.

Lorie Shaull/Flickr

If last week taught us anything, it's that there are tensions between  national, state, and local responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  Some of those tensions come from this uncomfortable disruption in our lifestyles. Some come from very real economic consequences.

  And according to Dr. Jeremy Youde, a political scientist at UMD and a global health expert, some of them come from cleavages and problems in our society that have been there all along.

©Lisa Johnson

There's another curve that's worrying animal welfare people across Minnesota ...

The kitten curve.

Spay/neuter procedures, except in cases of emergency, have been deemed "non-essential" and suspended at veterinarians, spay-neuter clinics and animal shelters.

But if homeless and stray cats are allowed to breed going into the spring, come May and June, shelters - just like hospitals with COVID-19 - are going to be overwhelmed with cats and litters of kittens.

Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank

Uncertainty is an extremely uncomfortable feeling for most people.

And life these days is nothing if not uncertain.

But when you panic and overbuy groceries, Shaye Moris says "that leaves a lot of our neighbors who don't have the resources to do that behind."

More information about Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank is here.

Copyright Gina Temple-Rhodes. Used with permission.

(left) “St. Matthew and the Angel” by Guido Reni, 1635 (right) Will Rhodes and his daughter, KiraCredit Copyright Gina Temple-Rhodes. Used with permission.Edit | Remove

Cabin-fevered brains are cooking up art recreations with stuff they find around the house (like pets and spouses and stuff).

Folks have been thinkng a lot about the second World War these days, remembering how the country came together with a common goal during a frightening period in its history.

Then, women had to step into unfamiliar roles and do it all: work, earn money, care for homes and family -- but when the war was over, there seemed to be a concerted effort to get women out of those jobs and careers.

Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases Johns Hopkins

Epidemiologist Dr. Catherine McCarty joins us this morning for a half-hour of conversation about the two kinds of testing much of the world is anxiously waiting for: the test to see of someone has COVID-19 and the test to see if they have the antibodies.

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