Journey to Wellness in Indian Country

Journey to Wellness // Monday 8:00am
A 10-minute bi-weekly program on Native American Community Health in MN and around the country in partnership with the University of Minnesota Medical School- Duluth Campus, Center of American Indian and Minority Health. The program will feature interviews with medical and health researchers, professors and doctors plus native people active in Native American health today. Journey to Wellness on KUMD is made possible by Ampers and the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.  

Minnesota Historical Society

Fort Snelling needs a name change, says the Minnesota Historical Society. That is, the historic site, not the fort itself.  So they've been holding meetings around the state to see what Minnesotans are suggesting and the public comment period closed last Friday.  They want to know how to best reflect the different kinds of stories now being told there.

Roxanne Gould is Ojibwe and an assistant professor in the College of Education and Human Service Professions at UMD.  Dr. Jim Rock is Dakota and the Director of Indigenous Programming at the Marshall Alworth Planetarium.

Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health/Facebook

When you think of world-class medicine in Minnesota, you probably think of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. But Johns Hopkins has just opened up a center here in Duluth, and the new director is also an adjunct  professor here at UMD.

Roxanne Gould

What happens at the intersection of Native American "ways of knowing" and the kind of academic rigor demanded of colleges and universities? The Andrew Mellon Foundation is spending two million dollars at the University of Minnesota - in the Twin Cities and Duluth - to find out the answer.

Native kids aged 10 to 24 have the highest rate of suicide of any age group in Minnesota -- more than three times that of white kids. 

Jonathan Thunder. Used with permission.

Although you've probably never thought about it this way, European colonizers exploring the world were more concerned with making themselves comfortable in new places (read "more familiar/Euro-centric") than appreciating or adapting to the environments and cultures that were already there.

You may know folks like this; perhaps not "colonizers," but people who want to stay in the comfort of what they know as opposed to learning new things.

The Sioux Chef/Facebook

It's pretty easy to bring a skill like mindfulness to eating.

Paying attention to that bite you put in your mouth? Enjoying it? Simple.

But many indigenous people are aware that they're not eating the kinds of foods that were traditional  (and healthy) for them prior to European contact. And they're thinking about what they eat, and why, and where it comes from.

Ivy Vainio/Association of American Indian Physicians

Dr. Mary Owen has a lot to be proud of.

Not only is she president-elect of the American Association of American Indian Physicians, the Center for American Indian and Minority Health and the University of Minnesota Medical School Duluth Campus welcomed a record-breaking 13 Native med students out of a class of 65 earlier this month.

mcav0y/Flickr

Duluth's Dr. Mary Owen, an Alaska Native and the head of UMD's Center of American Indian and Minority Health, isn't encouraged by the news from her friends and relatives in Juneau these days.  

photo by MMIWG-FFADA

Canada has finished its three-year inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous woman and girls. And they're calling it genocide. Is that the right word?

Wica Agli/Facebook

Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell just wishes he'd gotten started ten years ago.

Mending the Sacred Hoop's training and resource director is celebrating 25 years with the organization, long enough to see societal thought about violence against women begin to shift in some significant directions.

Thomas Hawk/Flickr

The National Indigenous Women's Resource Center keeps getting calls wondering how they're using the money they got from the distribution of the movie Wind River.

St. Louis County, MN

KUMD talks with Andrea Larson, a social worker with St. Louis County's Children and Family Services Indian Child Welfare Unit.  She has been recognized by the Minnesota Indian Child Welfare (ICWA) Advisory Council with its first ever Social Worker Award.  The ICWA Advisory Council created the award as a way to also acknowledge the good work that is happening in ICWA here in Minnesota. 

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