Journey to Wellness in Indian Country

Journey to Wellness // Monday 8:00am
A 10-minute bi-weekly program on Native American Community Health in MN and around the country in partnership with the University of Minnesota Medical School- Duluth Campus, Center of American Indian and Minority Health. The program will feature interviews with medical and health researchers, professors and doctors plus native people active in Native American health today. Journey to Wellness on KUMD is made possible by Ampers and the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.  

AICHO / Dabinoo 'Igan Domestic Violence Shelter

  [This episode of Journey to Wellness in Indian Country was originally aired on December 3, 2018, and was re-aired on December 31, 2018.] 

We speak with Shannon Larson, the Director of the Dabinoo 'Igan Domestic Violence Shelter (run by AICHO, the American Indian Community Housing Organization) about their move to a new, larger facility.

©AICHO Galleries

Photography gives people the chance to share the images and stories they see in their minds' eye with others.

So the upcoming exhibit, Through Our Eyes at AICHO Galleries at the end of this month not only gives a glimpse into the minds of Duluth's Native youth through their photographs and writings, it illuminates what in their culture is speaking to this next generation.

©AICHO

AICHO's purchase of the former 4th Street Market won't just restore food to a "food desert" in one of Duluth's poorest neighborhoods.

When it opens, perhaps next summer, it will provide four units of housing, an indigenous food market (perhaps the first in the state), a coffee shop, deli, gift shop and house a new coffee roasting business.

©Jonathan Thunder. Used with permission.

Duluth's indigenous community is gathering at City Hall on this rainy Monday to sing, celebrate a new eagle staff, and observe a moment of silence.

Colombus Day has been controversial for a long time now; many people see his "discovery of the New World" as the first step down a long road of devastation for the people who were already here.

But in Duluth, organizers are moving from "a day of mourning" to one of celebration - one that can make their children proud of their heritage.

©Kelly Hallman

Parents want to keep their children safe from anything that could harm them - including information.

Parents of Black sons report painful conversations with them about how society may treat them, but Kelly Hallman, the director of IMAGEN (Indigenous Adolescent Girls' Empowerment Network) says Native girls are already tuned into the dangers they see around them.

For years, the existing Thunderbird-Wren Halfway House and Treatment Center has been providing individualized treatment to those suffering from chemical dependency.  However, its facility on 4th Avenue West in Duluth is showing its age.

American Indian Cancer Foundation

For some Native American communities, there's a taboo against using the "C word" (cancer).

But Kris Rhodes of the American Indian Cancer Foundation says people need to learn to say it - and the sooner the better.

(This episode of Journey to Wellness in Indian Country was originally aired in March 2017)

Courtesy Vince Rock

Remember hearing about doctors making house calls?

People living on the Leech Lake reservation don't always have transportation to get to one of the seven community clinics.  And it's a big place. 

Duluth Public Schools/Facebook

Parsing the difference between "equality" and "equity" is the kind of thing you might expect in a school assignment.

The Duluth School Board is trying to do just that when it comes to compensatory education funds for schools, but the Education Equity Alliance, the Duluth Indigenous Commission, the local NAACP and several other community groups are giving them low marks so far.

People who would like more information on the work of the Education Equity Alliance can contact Dr. Mary Owen here:

©Dana Mattice

Artist, cartoonist and filmmaker Jonathan Thunder talks about art/Native art, artists/Native artists ... and arriving at a place where he most concerned with pleasing - or amusing - himself.

©Ivy Vainio

Giishpin bi-izhaayan kiwenz ojibwemowin gabeshiwining gidaa-gashkitoon ji-agindaman o’o ikidowinan.

©John Krumm

Four Native American doctors graduated from UMD's Medical School at the beginning of May.

Zoongide'win (zoon GED eh win) means "strong-hearted" in Ojibwe, and it's also the title of an exhibition this week of maps, manuscripts and the resilience of the people who were here long before Europeans arrived.

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