MN Reads

Join us Thursday mornings at 8:20 for Minnesota Reads on Northland Morning,  featuring Minnesota authors talking about their work.

Funding provided in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund

Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund

Folks have been thinkng a lot about the second World War these days, remembering how the country came together with a common goal during a frightening period in its history.

Then, women had to step into unfamiliar roles and do it all: work, earn money, care for homes and family -- but when the war was over, there seemed to be a concerted effort to get women out of those jobs and careers.

Playing the things-could-always-be-worse game isn't reliably useful to put things in perspective.

But still, 102 years ago, Duluthians were coping with war, flu -- and fire.

More information about the Virtual Book Launch for Duluth: An Urban Biography and to sign up for it is available here, and more information on the book itself is available here.

Most of the time, we don't talk about books that haven't been published yet on MN Reads, much less books that haven't even been written.

But when Tom Hanson, Ecolibrium 3 and the rest of the Lincoln Park neighborhood gets an idea for something great - there's no stopping them.

You can find out more about the OMC Smokehouse Cookbook and the Lift Lincoln Park project here.

 

Duluth author Margi Preus joins us to talk about her book launch. Once a shindig as befits the launch of two books at once, it's become a virtual event online, and we'll find out how you can take part.

More information about Margi's virtual book launch, live reading and more at her website, and on Facebook under Margi Preus Books.

In Hmong culture, it's an insult to call someone a "tigerbite."

It means you were stupid enough to approach a tiger and get bitten.

Tigers have been a metaphor for "things you should stay away from," and for many Hmong women, raised in a traditional, patriarchal culture, that list included anything that wasn't staying home and taking care of children and elders.

33 years after he published Birds in Minnesota, author and birder Bob Janssen returns with a revised and updated edition.

The bad news?  Bird populations across North America are casualties of climate change, habitat destruction, and cats.

The good news? Trumpeter swans, once extinct in Minnesota, have made a triumphant return and the Sax-Zim Bog preservation efforts are turning it into one of the premier conservation spots in the country.

Book nerds: if you had a 700-year old book in your collection, would you let anyone touch it?

If you just shrieked, internally, in horror, you'd be with most of us.

But luckily for us, Dr. Krista Twu, Associate Professor of Medieval & Renaissance Literature doesn't think that way.

Tonight (Thursday, 2/27), she'll be talking about UMD's Ramseyer Collection, and the opportunities for students and the community to learn from it.  And far from putting these ancient books under lock and key, Twu says "you should absolutely touch them."

When we have to take a deep dive into things we'd rather avoid, we call it a character-building experience.

Author and artist Tashia Hart knew her writing was lacking something.

So she made the decision to invite the character-building so she could finally build the characters she wanted to.

Gidjie and the Wolves will be published in March by Hart's (Not) Too Far Removed Press.

Novelist Dr Carter Meland will be on campus tomorrow afternoon giving a talk called "Finding Our Way with Native Literature."

He's a senior lecturer in American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota, and the author of a book called Stories for a Lost Child.

UMD

"Publish or perish."

But if success in academia is tied to writing books and journal articles about your research and what you do, how do you let a wider audience know about it?

In short, can academic writing ever top a best-seller list?

Maybe not, but in celebrating authors here at UMD, it's pretty plain that there is no lack of talent - and fascinating subject matter.

When you lose your language, you lose more than just words. You lose the words you use to hold weddings and funerals and welcome children. You use the words that shape and define your world view.

In his latest book, Dr. Anton Treuer talks about the revitalization of indigenous language and cultures and the success stories that are not only preserving language, they're making a huge difference for the people learning them.

The protagonist in Konnie Ellis's book Picnic in Venice "finds her way in the world through art."

Perhaps the same could be said of author-painter Ellis.

She's in the midst of a painting jag now, but she's still considering which of the Venice characters she might like to revisit in a future novel.

Picnic in Venice is published by Rocket Science Press.

Our guest this morning is Mark Munger,  and he's written the final chapter in his Finnish American trilogy, Kotimaa: Homeland.

Greg Helgeson / Minnesota Historical Society Press

"An embarassment of riches."

That's what retired MNHS Press editor Marilyn Ziebarth and exhibit curator Brian Horrigan had to wade through when they concieved of a book to tell the stories of Christmas in Minnesota through a variety of voices: old, new, men, women, contemporary and pre-statehood, funny, sad, poignant and more.

"Christmas in Minnesota," edited by Marilyn Ziebarth and Brian Horrigan, is published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press.

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