Neighbors

Every Tuesday and Thursday at 10am we've added Neighbors, a half-hour show that gives you a chance to share your experiences this time. From advice to what to do with teen kids at home to ways neighbors are helping each other out, we're connecting community members. Have this number handy if you'd like to call in and share your experiences, 218-726-7181

Sharon McCutcheon (l) and Joseph Ngabo (r)/Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic is turning out to be a lot more complicated than we thought.

How to stay safe and how to keep other people safe are complicated by issues of what safety really means: having a job? Being able to open your business?

University of Minnesota Duluth

Dr. Richard Buckalew of UMD is a mathematics professor at UMD, so unless you're pretty math-savvy yourself, things can veer off into the weeds pretty quickly.

But in addition to providing some infographics to help you better understand the math behind social distancing, he's got a lot of interesting things to say about the big differences small changes can make, and how to evaluate the news and claims crowding your social media feeds these days.

University of Minnesota Duluth

In one sense, John Bennett and the others at the University of Minnesota Extension's Center of Community Vitality are doing the same thing they've always done: gathering data, analyzing it, and providing it to the Northland in an easy-to-understand, accessible format.

Alexas_Fotos/Pixabay

Quarantining at home may be one of the most effective ways to stop the spread of COVID-19, but it also means more people are staying home - alone - with their abusers.

And it's no accident, either, that isolating the victim from their support system and other people is one of the first tools an abuser uses to control their partner.

  And when finally the bottom fell out
I became withdrawn
The only thing I knew how to do
Was to keep on keepin' on
Like a bird that flew
Tangled up in blue ......

The Duluth Dylan Fest was indeed blue back in March when they decided to cancel this year's celebration of the iconic singer-songwriter -- for about a minute.

Vin Crosbie/Flickr

We've come a long way from the days when Walter Cronkite, the anchorman of the CBS Evening News, was widely hailed as the "most trusted man in America."

Whether you blame the repeal of the Fairness Doctrine in 1987, the proliferation of the internet, or the shift from "journalists" to "content creators," separating truth from fiction - even as it pertains to those reporting or presenting "the news" has become impossibly complicated.

And at the same time, the most important work, that of local newspapers, radio and television, is disappearing bit by bit.

Locally Laid Egg Company and Sebastian Dumitru/Unsplash

Maybe you can't hoard eggs.  But they're - pardon the expression - flying off store shelves as more and more people are cooking and baking.

So even though they're busy selling all the eggs they can produce, Jason and Lucie Amundsen of Locally Laid Egg Company hit on another idea to help local folks interested in urban agriculture.

Anthony Crider/Flickr

An article in Forbes magazine this week was titled "Security Researchers Say The Reopen America Campaign Is Being Astroturfed."

It laid out in detail how cybersecurity researchers determined that, far from being spontaneous and organic (grassroots, if you will) the protests "can be linked to domains associated with gun advocacy groups, lobbyists, and other conservative organisations."

GoToVan/Flickr

People interpret the information about COVID-19 and/or the economy depending on how these things affect them.

  Is there any way to get close to an objective method to weigh these two competing interests?  How should we be thinking about this?  How should we be parsing the information we get about both issues?

Fusion Medical Animation/Unsplash

Last week's announcement by the World Health Organization that "there's no evidence shows that having coronavirus prevents a second infection" is a big deal, because almost all of our ideas of how "moving forward" looks are predicated on the assumption that people who have had the virus are "safe to resume normal life."

Mubariz Mehdizadeh/Unsplash

If you suffer from a mental illness like anxiety or depression, chances are you have several tools in your toolbox to help you cope and get back to a healthier state of mind.

But what if you've been fine your whole life - until now - and you're wondering why the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic are turning you into someone you don't recognize?

Lorie Shaull/Flickr

If last week taught us anything, it's that there are tensions between  national, state, and local responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  Some of those tensions come from this uncomfortable disruption in our lifestyles. Some come from very real economic consequences.

  And according to Dr. Jeremy Youde, a political scientist at UMD and a global health expert, some of them come from cleavages and problems in our society that have been there all along.

Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank

Uncertainty is an extremely uncomfortable feeling for most people.

And life these days is nothing if not uncertain.

But when you panic and overbuy groceries, Shaye Moris says "that leaves a lot of our neighbors who don't have the resources to do that behind."

More information about Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank is here.

Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases Johns Hopkins

Epidemiologist Dr. Catherine McCarty joins us this morning for a half-hour of conversation about the two kinds of testing much of the world is anxiously waiting for: the test to see of someone has COVID-19 and the test to see if they have the antibodies.

Copyright Ivy Vainio. Used with permission.

The Duluth Branch NAACP was going to spend an hour and a half last night, distributing free cloth face masks to anyone, but particularly to Black, Indigenous, and people of color in our community.

Minority populations across the country are disproportionately represented in both COVID-19 cases and deaths, partly due to less access to health care and partly to higher rates of hypertension, diabetes and respiratory diseases.

But half an hour later, all the masks were gone.

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