Neighbors

Every Tuesday and Thursday at 10am we've added Neighbors, a half-hour show that gives you a chance to share your experiences this time. From advice to what to do with teen kids at home to ways neighbors are helping each other out, we're connecting community members. Have this number handy if you'd like to call in and share your experiences, 218-726-7181

Lorie Shaull/Flickr

If last week taught us anything, it's that there are tensions between  national, state, and local responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  Some of those tensions come from this uncomfortable disruption in our lifestyles. Some come from very real economic consequences.

  And according to Dr. Jeremy Youde, a political scientist at UMD and a global health expert, some of them come from cleavages and problems in our society that have been there all along.

Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank

Uncertainty is an extremely uncomfortable feeling for most people.

And life these days is nothing if not uncertain.

But when you panic and overbuy groceries, Shaye Moris says "that leaves a lot of our neighbors who don't have the resources to do that behind."

More information about Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank is here.

Coronavirus COVID-19 global cases Johns Hopkins

Epidemiologist Dr. Catherine McCarty joins us this morning for a half-hour of conversation about the two kinds of testing much of the world is anxiously waiting for: the test to see of someone has COVID-19 and the test to see if they have the antibodies.

Copyright Ivy Vainio. Used with permission.

The Duluth Branch NAACP was going to spend an hour and a half last night, distributing free cloth face masks to anyone, but particularly to Black, Indigenous, and people of color in our community.

Minority populations across the country are disproportionately represented in both COVID-19 cases and deaths, partly due to less access to health care and partly to higher rates of hypertension, diabetes and respiratory diseases.

But half an hour later, all the masks were gone.

Emma Matthews/Unsplash

Should your kids be getting up at the "regular" time, even if they don't have a class online they need to join?

Should they be doing more chores around the house, volunteering or engaging in other Useful Pursuits?

Boys & Girls Clubs of the Northland/Facebook

It takes a village, not just to raise a child,  but to feed children especially when the safety nets (like school meals) are compromised.

Ecolibrium3, the Salvation Army and the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Northland are stepping up to make sure kids have meals and snacks now that it's spring break.

Information on how you can help the Boys & Girls Clubs provide for our local kids is here.

David Lezcano/Unsplash

Normal reactions to abnormal circumstances. Prodding for an "aha moment." Navigating the "supposed tos."  The "human being vs. human doing" conundrum.

We'll take a look at what might be frazzling you these days when we're joined by Dr. Andrew John, a professor in the Doctor in Counseling Psychology program at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Dana DeVolk/Unsplash

On the one hand, folks are supposed to stay home.

But on the other hand, they are allowed to shop for food.

And since food supplier Sysco Minnesota had some perishable stuff sitting around (about a ton and a half, to be precise), they offered it to the community.  Now Bent Paddle Brewing Company, Clyde Iron Works, Pier B Resort Hotel and the 2020 Census are putting on a Free Farmer's Market this afternoon.

Plus how one kid is spending his break (so far) enjoying "chemistry" with his family.

Noah/Unsplash

Cook County businessman Mike Larson talks about making the tough decision last week to shut down his vacation-rental business. 

And Cook County has joined a number of rural, vacationland counties in the region asking vacationers, second-home owners and those fleeing coronavirus to stay home - for now.

Look Out for the Helpers/Facebook

We're bringing back the golden days of radio, updated for our new circumstances!

 This morning we debuted Neighbors, a combination interview/call in program to help keep us connected in these uncertain times.

 "Look Out for the Helpers" is a local group doing just that: looking out for the helpers.  In this case, that means raising money to provide local healthcare workers with coffee, bakery items and meals.

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